the deck on my Pearson Ensign

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by LeRi222, Apr 2, 2010.

  1. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Spared length is 35' 9" with the square courses, which is a tad longer then without (dashed line).

    Strip planking requires very little planking skill, though a little tedious, easily done and best of all, you can use lesser grades of lumber too.

    As to rig proportions, well it looks a little small, but you really can't tell by looks. Sharpie hulls usually need lower aspect rigs, so maybe it'll work, but you have to do the math to be sure. What is the wetted surface of the hull?
     
  2. seasailor55
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    seasailor55 Senior Member

    I have attached a sketch of a version with a taller, larger rig with topmasts, 2 headsails, 2 staysails, and a larger square fore topsail. This was the original rig that I drew, but after calculating the sail area, I felt that 426 sq.ft. on a 21'6" sharpie hull might be a bit much, so I cut it down. The 22'6" Ensign and the Cape Dory 22 each have roughly 240 sq. ft. of sail (100% foretriangle) and 3000 to 3200 lbs displacement with 1000 -1200 lbs. of ballast by comparison. The smaller rig is also simpler with pole masts.

    Wetted surface? I get 240 sq. ft. based on the footprint of the hull bottom and the sides of the submerged hull, keel, and rudder, but that's probably oversimplifying things.
     

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  3. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    It's (again) tough to tell, just by looking but if wetted area to sail area is a rough guide, you're in the ball bark, but the numbers need to be crunched, just to make sure launching day isn't as embarrassing as it could be.

    To reinforce this, I know a fellow that built a schooner on a sharpie hull, proportioned it (everything for that matter) by eye and launched. It floated pretty much where he'd eyeballed, but capsized within 100 yards of the ramp, once he hoisted sails and headed out. He'd gotten everything wrong in regard to the centers, weights and masses locations, etc. He had too little lead, too much area, with too high a CG on a boat with modest initial stability, etc. In his defense, he did convert to a sloop, with some help from me and the boat is still sailing today (launched about 8 years ago).
     
  4. seasailor55
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    seasailor55 Senior Member

    Great advice Paul, and a reminder of what can happen if all the bases aren't covered. Precisely why guys like me should defer to guys like you when it comes to these things and pose questions. I realize that all designs are a compromise of some sort, especially for production boats that need to appeal to a wide audience to keep the sales numbers right.

    I'm sure designers get tired of "I like that design BUT I would change this or that". If I remember correctly, you posted a sketch of a small brig on this site somewhere that had most of what I'm proposing (flat bottom, dual cockpits, wheel steering, outboard in a well) and was around 24'.

    Strip planking. Sounds interesting. Please elaborate, if you would. What would the structure compose of (framing, stringers, etc.) and how does the planking proceed on a strip planked boat? If the EMILY ROSE could be built by amateurs, if might be just the thing. By the way, I tried but couldn't resist the fake gunports so here's another sketch.
     

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  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The strips for Emily Rose can be done two ways; one is an all strip layup with an external sheathing, while the other is a thinner strip layup with a molded veneer on the exterior. Each has it's advantages and disadvantages, but the larger strip method is faster and requires less fitting.

    The larger strip method has approximately 48 strips (per side), from keel to sheer and these are edge set 1x2's of SYP or Douglas fir. Actually the SYP is slightly smaller in thickness (about 5/8"). They are laid over station molds on about 24" centers and edge glued. They can be cove and bead if desired, but I've found this is more trouble than it's worth, except in the after quarters, where the bilge makes a pretty hard turn. The cove and bead does help align the strips in this location. Once the strips are laid, the seam gaps (there will be some) are filled and the hull faired, smoothed, then sheathed for abrasion protection. The plans also include sheathing the bilge internally, to just above the soles, if only to seal in the planking with a durable skin. Once the hull shell is laid up, the hull is righted and the molds pulled out as the bulkhead and furniture partitions tabbed to the shell.

    After the bulkheads and partitions are tabbed in, the soles and decks go on and the deckhouse(s) can be installed. It's basic strip plank technique and you can use a pretty low grade of lumber for the strips. My recommendation is to buy 2x10's and 2x12's from the local big box store, sorting through each stack to get the straight grain ones. These can be shoved through a table saw and the edge cut off at 3/4" making 1x2's cheaply and also orienting the grain to quarter or vertical stock. This allows you to buy just a few 16' boards and get all of your 1x2 planking stock very inexpensively. Because you've used 16' 2x12's, the tree they came from has to be fairly old and dense as a result, producing good stock for the 1x2's.

    I don't remember any Brig sketches, though they may be something I've done, but just don't remember. Since I can't remember, it must have just been a quick sketch, as I remember all the finished work. There are several "tricks" you'll need to do to get a reasonable square rig to work. Aside the obvious sail handling stuff, the hull will need some power and good initial stability. This coupled with a light weight build, so the ballast ratio can be respectable will go a long way to making a boat like this viable.

    Your sketch shows a keel with some drag and the ballast centrally located, with some overhangs too. I'd spread out the ballast along the deadwood, remove the keel drag with a dead straight keel bottom and move the ends out a bit to reduce the overhangs. I'd also divide the appendages, with a centrally located (long) fin and skeg hung rudder, located at the very aft end of the LWL. Simply put, lateral forward of say station 3 and aft of station 7 really isn't helping much, just making more wetted surface and drag. The rudder will work better and be much more responsive is skeg hug, well aft of the fin. The spread out ballast will make the boat more comfortable and much more forgiving to trim imbalances. I'd also consider a gaff fore, instead of the staysail, as you'll be under fore and aft most of the time, so you'll want to fill the area between the mast as best as you can. Topsails and a fisherman can help in light air. The courses will be for parades and occasions you just want to show off really. These can be setup on roller furlers down the center of the sail and rolled up for tacking or upwind work. The tape rollers are setup with some slack to let the course billow a bit and naturally, the sail maker will need to know what's going on, so they can do a reasonable job of it.
     
  6. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

  7. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Think I've found the Brig sketches . :cool:
    The sketches can be found at . . . .

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/bo...proposed-boat-project-48503-4.html#post657838 (post #55)

    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/bo...proposed-boat-project-48503-4.html#post658103 (post #57)

    Seasailor55, if the litle more draft of Emily Rose is OK for you then my advice would be, go for her :), she'll give you a much better sailboat + the kids will have plenty of strings to pull + there are ready to go plans for her . . . :idea:
     
  8. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    I'll think the drawing in post #279 shows the outboard in a well option as the info here on this drawing shows the 10 HP inboard + drive shaft option. Looking at PAR's plans there are many options for everything . . :)

    PS

    Look also at Discrete at PAR's plans site and his gallery here.

    [​IMG]
    - - click pic to enlarge - -


    Take note: Discrete is buildable in various LOD sizes, drafts, rigs, bow forms, stern forms, cabin/cockpit lengths, build methods, auxiliary types, keel & rudder options, etc. etc...
     
  9. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Discrete is available in two lengths 18' and 20' on deck. The 20'er is a straight stretch, with counter stern option, making her slightly longer yet. I think Discrete has been discussed enough here (previous threads) and she has several build methods and other options.

    The sketch:

    [​IMG]

    is simply that and just a doodling of a pretty impractical arrangement, though certainly possible.

    I'm reminded of the "Maryland Federalist":

    [​IMG]

    which is fully functional at 15' and completely traditional in construction. I wouldn't want to have to sail this little puppy, even if it does look cool.

    www.nasoh.org/Newsletters/OldNewsletters/1988_3.pdf

    Attached is a 26'er, flat bottom, impractical rig, deep well deck, raised foredeck and deep cockpit aft, no gun ports though. It does have a modern set of appendages and could handle a small inboard or well mounted outboard. Draft could be reduced and a centerboard employed, likely all below the sole, so no protruding case to trip over.
     

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  10. seasailor55
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    seasailor55 Senior Member

    I like it. The rig might be more practical if we left the mainmast fore and aft rigged. It would then essentially be a topsail schooner. As you say,the modern appendages reduce wetted surface and still give stability and lateral plane. Would it need a centerboard, or is it fine like it is? I assume this could done in sheet material or strip planked.

    You have piqued my curiosity. I've always admired but avoided round bilge designs, considering them too challenging or beyond my set of skills. If a hull can be built upside down of light strips of relatively inexpensive materials over temporary framing, with bulkheads and other permanent joinery supplying stiffness, this opens up a whole new set of options. By way of attaching the ballast keel, I assume that some sort of grid or method for strengthening the hull in this area would be necessary, right?
     
  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yes, I agree a topsail schooner would be much more practical. This version doesn't need a centerboard, though the draft could be reduced, with a stub keel and a board housed within it, to lessen impact inside the cabin.

    Round bilge designs aren't as hard as you might think. Strip planking is the home builder's best friend. One of my designs is being built in the panhandle and it's a Friendship sloop of similar size. The deadwood assembly is made from big box store 2x12's, cut down to 1x6's on a rented table saw. The hull planking (also 1x2's set on edge) where cut from 2x10's and 2x12's again from the same big box store and edge set over molds. He has about $300 in big box store planking, about the same for the deadwood and a two days rental on a 12" table saw, so you do the math . . . Yep, the keel is hung from bolts through structural floors, inside the hull shell. These floors do have a modest structural grid of stringers, but they're more for other stuff, such the engine beds, mast step, etc., so they had to be there anyway. On the Friendship sloop, he's leaving the inside of the boat bright in most places, because once he had the epoxy on, he just can't bring himself to paint it. The outside needs fairing, so he'll paint there, but the light pine color inside will be nice. The bilge and other enclosed areas (lockers, under the V berth, etc.) will be skinned with 12 ounce and painted, but the rest will be varnished over 4 ounce.
     

  12. seasailor55
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    seasailor55 Senior Member

    Picked up an abandoned Irwin 25 from the local yacht for $50.00 Needs replacement of the port side bulkhead by way of the chainplates, and some other repairs, mostly minor.
     
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