a little astray, but what could you do w/ a boat like this?

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by SinkingDream, Apr 9, 2018.

  1. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    That's completely freaked out, even to think that's possible . . . . . . . . . :eek:

    The OP said in post #1 ‘‘ 10 knt ’’ and in post #3 ‘‘ Estimate fuel consumption at 2 gal per nm ’’ which means 20 GPH @ 10 knots . . ;)
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2018
  2. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Angel, this puppy has proven to be combative and at the very least odd with many of his post since joining recently. We've seen this type previously and they do tend to eliminate themselves. My information wasn't Wiki anything, but a text book on my shelf, verified with the section numbers in the posted images. I recently completed and participated in a yacht conversion in New Zealand on one of their coast guard patrol boats of this era. I'm somewhat familiar with both and the hull shapes used are poor, propulsion antique at best and though a fair bit of internal volume to play with, usually pretty worn out by the time the present themselves to private service. Maybe China boy has more experience than me, but I'll bet he's just a armchair sailor with no practical experence on or off the water. At least his posts thus far have suggest such.
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2018
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  3. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    PAR is right see Active Class Patrol Boats List of United States Coast Guard cutters - Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_Coast_Guard_cutters These were built and used primarily by the Coast Guard to chase rum runners. Commonly know to their crews as a buck and a quarter. I trained on the Cuyahoga WIX 157 in 1976 while in Officer Candidate School. Unfortunately she was sunk in a collision with a merchant vessel in 1978 see USCGC Cuyahoga (WIX-157) - Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USCGC_Cuyahoga_(WIX-157) There are still a few around in private hands, usually very modified. They would make a nice yacht but would require some very deep pockets. The clutches on these were pneumatic, and notorious for failing when needed the most. I nearly rammed the pier at Yorktown while conning the Cuyahoga because the clutches did not cut in right away. Another Officer Candidate did ram the pier because of this. (She commanded three Coast Guard Cutters in her career and me, none. Maybe I should have rammed the darn pier!)
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Peter, from your memory of these old gals, how'd they handle, particularly in a rough patch of sea?
     
  5. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    Don't know. We only went cruising on the Chesapeake. Never took it to sea. As long as everything was working right they were easily handled. (considering the age of the Cuyahoga, it was amazing anything worked right) We went up Daugherty Creek at Crisfield MD and docked in Sommers Cove without any problems. Shallow and a narrow channel. So shallow we actually hit bottom at one point. Had to stay in the channel. But out on open water it was fairly calm and foggy. There was a stiff current in the York River but except for the problem with the clutches, we had no real difficulties. Actually I thought it rode better than the CGC Reliance (a 210 foot ship). But then we did take the Reliance to sea in some pretty nasty weather.
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I have data that called them rollers, though I suspect later modifications could have solved this concern.
     
  7. AnthonyW
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    AnthonyW Senior Member

    Hi Par

    Can you share some thoughts on what may been the cause of their poor performance in rough seas? If not off this one, how did the NZ boat perform, and were modifications made? If so do you know? I imagine this calls for some speculation, but I am interested.

    Thanks

    Anthony
     
  8. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Last edited: Apr 28, 2018
  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Have fun Dan, please check out her 3" Douglas fir planking, as the Lady's 76 y/o by now, but she's sure looking sharp in the picture . . :)

    [​IMG]
    (larger version of 4,928 × 3,264 pixels)
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2018
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  10. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    What is the chafing plate made of?
     
  11. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    In general for these kind of boats, maybe add aft some 'hobbles' aka 'anti squat boards' for aft planing instead of digging in when increasing power, which also could give some extra aft buoyancy when pressed down, and it could double as a swim platform in a yacht conversion, just some thoughts...

    See the thread: Nozzles and Fins ---> post #7, and further...

    [​IMG]

    Note the aft add on's bottom is in rest only just subsurface, I'll think the waterline is painted a bit above the water in the below picture...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2018
  12. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Looks like brass to me, you'll check it out I'll guess . . :)
     
  13. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Nope, it's bronze and she had a well documented redo recently.

    That era WPC's were disadvantaged from the onset, mostly because the hull forms were intended for a different role then they end up performing. In the late 20's and early 30's these were intended to intercept the mother sips to the rum runners. In this role, they didn't need to be fast, just able to sneak up on an unsuspecting yacht or barge, aim a 50 cal at them and take possession. No gyro's, no bilge runners, a bit top heavy, etc., coupled with the hull form choices of the era, made them rollers, unless upgraded.

    The NZ project turned out well. The boat had stabilization added, propulsion and a host of other treatments including a small helopad. Performance and maneuverability were above expectation, as were accommodations.
     
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  14. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Was answering the previous question by Anthony.
     

  15. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    After the first line the post was going back to the original topic.

    P.S. - I now see that was already answered, so a note to myself: "refresh the page before posting a response"
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2018
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