Zoom talk about building a 16 foot strip planked sailing dinghy

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by John Perry, Dec 6, 2021.

  1. John Perry
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    John Perry Senior Member

    Next Saturday evening, December 11th, at 7:30pm, Steve Goodchild is giving a Zoom presentation about his building of a 'Stornaway' 16 foot cruising dinghy. This is one of the Amateur Yacht Research Society monthly Zoom meetings but AYRS meetings are open to all so do feel free to join us.

    Steve is an experienced woodworker, at one time he owned and ran a furniture making factory in Malawi, but this was his first boat building project.

    I hope that this meeting will show that the AYRS is not just about experimental boats but is also relevant to the building of practical boats for everday use. Even if a boat building project produces a fairly conventional end result there is plenty of scope for innovation, both in the details and fittings and in the construction methods. I think this will be well demonstrated by Steve’s project.

    If you would like a preview to Steve’s presentation, the Stornoway 16 is a design by Selway Fisher and the example built by Steve is featured at this webpage:

    https://epoxycraft.com/projects/bui....com/projects/building-a-stornoway-16-part-3/

    Picture below is of Steve's boat under construction.

    The link to join this meeting is

    Join our Cloud HD Video Meeting https://us06web.zoom.us/j/2536740617?pwd=VFdMOGxWRDNzK1Z4NkxpTkU1a3ZUZz09

    The meeting ID is 253 674 0617 and the passcode is simply ayrs but if you open Zoom through the link above I don't think you will need the ID or passcode.
     

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  2. Heimfried
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    Heimfried Senior Member

    London Time
     
  3. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    The builder of the boat in that picture is certainly the consummate craftsman. The extent of the work that went into that project is apparent. There are an impressive lot of strips that have been carefully fitted and bent to accurately match the adjoining strips. After all that work there is much fairing and sanding to do. Builder may have had to pull several zillion staples before the finishing process could begin..............Hats off to the builder.
     
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  4. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I don't see any staple marks. Guessing he used straps. Really beautiful work indeed.
     
  5. Heimfried
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    Heimfried Senior Member

    The builder didn't use any staples and also no straps. Just a lot of simple but subtile wooden clamps with wedges. Therefore he only was able to attach two wooden strips at each side of the hull at a time. Than had to wait for the next day allowing the epoxy to set.
     

  6. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    If you start in the middle; you can work in two directions, but yes, this is two per side per day then.
     
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