Yacht Steering Pedestal

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by AppleNation, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. AppleNation
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    AppleNation Junior Member

    Hi All.

    I am wanting to build a steering pedestal our of carbon or glass fibre.

    Something like the V800 here: http://www.vmgmarine.co.uk/products/steering-pedestals

    Is this a fairly straight forward task?

    The design looks straight forward but I am concerned about the engineering - especially if I do it in glass.

    Can anyone recommend someone to help with this project?

    Thanks.
     
  2. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Easy. The more modern carbon pedastles are bipedal...two legs. They are more robust and the second leg enables cable run or throttle control



    I might have some photos...ill check and post.

    Uni directional and bi directional carbon socks can be purchased. Eglass is also availble
    These are the logical choice.
    Google it.




    Mounting flanges and local reinforcements need some detailing.

    Easy to overcome engieering scantlings by adding more fiber.

    If you need the pedastle to be super, gran prix light then it would be wise to consult a pro.


    A mock up full scale model of pvc pipe of box section ply would be wise.

    The mock up can form part of you mold form.

    For ideas google the guys making composite bicycle frames
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Don't let TANSL here this, as he'll suggest learning virtual 3D modeling as the way to go. :)
     
  4. Stumble
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    Most of the commercial ones are using prepegs, high preassure autoclaves, and long post cure times, but they are also primarily for race boats. I don't know that it would be realistic to try and duplicate this without a significant investment in equipment.

    But then the current design is towards very thin, single legged pedestals that use a minimum of material. A more robust double legged pedestal would probably be more forgiving in material and build processes.
     
  5. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I guess you could use a computer...i just dont know how.

    As a form for hollow sections I like useing pvc.

    Not long ago I needed to make some airfoil looking struts for a hard top.

    Pvc easily deforms at low temp. I took a piece of thin wall pvc pipe and a heat gun and with trial and error I crushed the heat softened pvc with a crude plywood form.

    After a few rejects I was able to accurately form four pvc struts , then covered the formed pvc with uni and bi directional socks. It was cheaper , a lot less messy than shaping foam and the finished strut was hollow so routing hardtop electric cables was easy
     

  6. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I was just looking at TP52 s while at a recent regatta and many were bipedal.
    One leg held the helmsmans instrument.

    If you need super light then investment in technolgy is needed. If you need a pedasltle that is simply light and durable you could easily wet layup .

    If this is a cruiser the pedestal needs to be very robust. It common to safety harness directly to the steering wheel hub nut.
     
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