wooden motorsailer restoration

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by eugene, Nov 24, 2003.

  1. eugene
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: south africa

    eugene New Member

    Sea Shanty
    I live down south in cape town south africa and intend buying a 52 ft wooden motorsailer that is in serious need of restoration. This is a boat that was originaly built as a trawler and later converted to a motorsailer. I am in need of advise in what to look for, how to go about planning the project and and where to find the necessary support and info. I am a novice at this and I am apealing for any help out there I can get. Looking forward to hearing from anyone who can assist.

    Eugene
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,150
    Likes: 540, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Find a surveyor. If you are not knowledgeable, what you pay for the service is the best insurance. Some of the things to look for are:
    Fasteners-type, metal alloy, corrosion, stress cracks, etc.
    Planking-splits, butblock condition, rot, stress damage
    Framing-same
    Ceiling-same
    Deck-same
    Caulking-seams, type and method of caulking
    Engine stringers
    bulkheads
    machinery
    electrical systems
    hydraulic systems
    There is more
     
  3. eugene
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 3
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    Location: south africa

    eugene New Member

    Hi gonzo,
    Thank you very much for the reply. I will certainly have it serveyed as you suggested. Any help as to what and where I can get help(books, newsletters, photos, previous projects, info) on how to go about the project will be greatly appreciated. The pilot house and rear cabin on this boat has to be discarded and rebuilt completely. She went down at her mooring some 2 years ago but spent only one night under water. She has been standing on the hard since then.

    Regards,
    Eugene
     
  4. mmd
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Bridgewater NS Canada

    mmd Senior Member

  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,150
    Likes: 540, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    A sinker in salt water needs to be rewired and have all switches replaced. It may not cause a problem right away, but the salt will travel by capillary action and cause severe corrosion. Also, do you know why she sank?
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 473, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A 52' boat of any configuration is a big project for a "novice" to attempt. Since you're asking the most basic of information about project planning and techniques, I'd be inclined to steer you away (far away) from this boat.

    A craft of this size, will require a tremendous amount of effort on many levels of expertise, which the "novice" will not have and must job out. Jobbing out does get it done, but it costs the most and is the least rewarding.

    Access you're skills and set up a reasonably sustainable budget schedule. Take a look at WoodenBoat 174 page 40 and see if the numbers and time frame for the fixes are within your means. This couple put a lot of effort towards the restoration of this 56' motor cruiser and they had plenty of experience with larger power yachts owning another 45'er at the time of the purchase of the 56'er. Many thousands of dollars could have been saved by doing a lot of the "yard" work themselves, but time and skill issues always work their way into the mix. This restoration could have cost much, more as well, but the skills and talents of the owners helped trim down the effort needed by the yard.

    I've seen to many fine yachts get placed on stands with the best intensions, just to find a chain saw ripping into her flanks years later to make room for the new family room off the porch or to make the pieces small enough to fit in a dumpster, because the house is sold and the wife says "It Ain't Going With Us . . ."

    Thinking smaller, as a person new to this sort of thing, your chances of success will be much greater. After gaining some experience with restoration, you'll naturally find yourself moving up in size, until you find the perfect yacht for you.

    Good Luck . . .
     

  7. eugene
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: south africa

    eugene New Member

    Thankyou for some very sound advise. I have spoken to a potential surveyer localy who knows the boat well. His advise was simular. Off course,I must admit that if one is as unqualified as I am, it is easy to see the end product in one's mind without considering the reality of the work and expertee needed to get it there. I have not discarded the idea yet, but the size of the task is becoming more clear thanks to some good advise. If you guys are interested I could attach some photos just for interest sake.

    Regards
     
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