Wood and Resale Value

Discussion in 'Materials' started by MadSpazz, Oct 18, 2011.

  1. MadSpazz
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    MadSpazz New Member

    Hi all,

    I am in the initial phases of the boat building process. I plan to build a skiff of stitch and glue construction but before I purchase my materials I have a question. How will resale value be affected if I build the boat from meranti vs okume? And similarly, how will resale value be affected by 1088 vs 6566 in either of the two above woods?

    Due to storage issues and whatnot I may not be able to keep the boat for very long after completing the project (I do have room for the build since that is temporary). I still want to build the boat for the construction process alone, even if I need to sell the boat shortly after finishing. Anyway, if/when I sell the boat I would like to be able to recoup as much as possible, hence the questions here.

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    A home built has little resale value, so the pywood type will make almost no difference.
     
  3. sabahcat
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    sabahcat Senior Member

    On all types of vessels or just small skiffs?
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Pretty much on all. Unless a builder with a good reputation built the boat, the value is rather low. Also, amateurs often think that their build time can be added to the value. A professional can build the boat at a lower cost in labor.
     
  5. sabahcat
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    sabahcat Senior Member

    Funny
    My last boat @ 6 years of age, sold for probably more than anything new and production in its class
    Plenty of so called "amateur" built multi's in Australia and NZ do the same
     

  6. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    All boats have poor resale value !!!!

    Home built ? Even more so.... Many times home builders get the construction detailing 90 percent correct but its the missing 10 percent which always separates the pro from the amateur.

    Yesterday I was on a home build 45 ft multichine steel sailboat. The home builder did a nice job on her construction, nice equipment, but there to many issues with detailing .... rust bleed running out of deck and hull fasteners, machinery installation errors, wiring, ergonomics..

    I would judge its resale value very low.

    As for what type plywood. Okume is more susceptible to rot. On a pro build boat this is an small issue because the builder would have used appropriate detail like avoiding mechanical fasteners puncturing the waterproof skin .

    For a nice homebuild skiff I would concider her resale value to be the cost of materials.
     
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