windshield

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Art1848, Jul 4, 2016.

  1. Art1848
    Joined: May 2016
    Posts: 25
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    Location: Wausaukee WI.

    Art1848 Junior Member

    Anyone have helpful hints on getting my 1975 slickcrafts windshield off, Some of the bolts holding it on are rusted away, some are broke, the rest are off, still seems glued on. Thanks
     
  2. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 470, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Fastener removal is one of those things you acquire skills at, as you repair and restore stuff. In many cases, you simply have little choice, but to hack them off, but in many cases, you just need to apply enough force. Impact drivers can make quick work of stubborn fasteners, after liberal doses of penetrating oil. In some cases you'll want to use a custom mix of penetrating stuff, like automatic trans oil, mixed 50/50 with spirits.

    Heat is the usual choice when faced with really tough ones, but you have to be careful about surrounding areas. Lastly are the drill out options. I turn to bolt extractors for screws first, which will remove the whole thing, but sometimes, you just need to drill them out or simply cut them, doing as little damage to the matting surfaces as possible. Each fastener situation will provide avenues of attack, but when faced with a bunch to do at once, I usually pull out the drill bits, the "easyout" box and start drilling all the pilot holes in each.
     
  3. Art1848
    Joined: May 2016
    Posts: 25
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    Location: Wausaukee WI.

    Art1848 Junior Member

    I have the fasteners off, it's the bond between the alum. frame and the fiberglass that's the real devil.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 470, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Use a heat gun and focus it on the aluminum frame. There might be some bedding or possibly some adhesive, which should loosen up a bit, probably enough to pry it up. If not, use wooden wedges or shims, like the type you use installing a window or door in a house. Drive in a wedge, apply heat, drive in more wedges, etc., until you've convinced it to pop free. It'll probably fight you for a while, then all of a sudden just start to lift or maybe if you're lucky pop up clean. If you luck is much like mine, you'll fight it to the last inch. I like to use the hard plastic shims, seen in the cabinet section of Lowe's/Depot. These are tough, don't split or get mashed and can be reused. Wooden ones (cedar shakes) will do, though they split, crush and all the other stuff, but are usually cheaper. I literally have boxes full of these puppies, some oak, many pine or cedar and quite a few of the plastic ones. Then again, you can make your own if you want, which I've also had to do many times, because I'm too absentminded to bring them along on a job.
     

  5. Art1848
    Joined: May 2016
    Posts: 25
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Wausaukee WI.

    Art1848 Junior Member

    Got it, wooden wedges, putty knives, brake cleaner, and being so careful, Thanks.
     
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