Window feasibility question

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Wavewacker, Jun 5, 2016.

  1. Wavewacker
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: Springfield, Mo.

    Wavewacker Senior Member

    I'd really like to use some commercial windows i have on a garvey build.

    The windows are bullet proof out of a bank remodel and they are 50x40 inches, metal frames add 1.5 inches on each side for the frame. Glass is about 1.5 inches thick. Yes, they re heavy about 60 pounds each. I have 5 of them!

    Guess this would be along the lines of a large "Birdwatcher" I'd like to stay under 24 feet LOA.

    Instead of plumb windows I thought if they cantered in at the top about a foot with the 40 inch height, I'd have about a 4' roof and 8' beam.

    2 windows tilted more for the windshield one on each side and one plumb on the back of the cabin.

    The glass is heavily tinted as well.

    This is a low powered cruising garvey, for rivers, lakes and may be the eastern ICW and around the keys. A camping cruiser.

    The boat will carry 2 and a dog, sometimes on a daily outing more guests.

    Just a little over 6' head room where these windows would be.

    Seems with about 28 inches to the gunnels, the slated glass would hit a roof with about 8 inches of framing above the windows with 6'4" headroom. Roughly.

    I know they are huge and heavy but it seems to me they would be water tight and very strong, structural glass according to a local glass company owner.

    Why use them? 1. I have them. 2. I like the idea of bullet proof. 3. They can take a beating. 4. It would be like a sunroom, lots of light offering good vision.

    May be this is the first boat that is to be built around the windows, LOL

    How small of a ship would be required to fit these? :confused:
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The problem with this idea, is that you are not building a boat around the windows. You are adding the windows to a design in which they are not appropriate. If you want a bulletproof boat, plywood hull and decks make no sense.
     
  3. Wavewacker
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    Location: Springfield, Mo.

    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Yes, I know, I appreciate your advice Gonzo.

    Sometimes kids play with guns, all they want to do is bust your windows. If you have a really bad type and you are seen in the window, he probably will not shoot at the hull but at you, a window shot. Now, seriously, I'm not going to war nor do I think I'll encounter those pirates you spoke of.

    That leaves` us with the other reasons to try and use them.

    The garvey may well be planked, I have heavy lumber, it will be a heavier boat to run up on river banks and shore lines.

    Looking for ideas

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?145714-NJ-Garvey-build&highlight=nj garvey

    post #45, 3rd picture, the grey one with the cabin top is the inspiration. Just a different style cabin.

    Other than that, I don't have a design, I'm looking for one that would be feasible for a glass house.

    I think the bullet proof aspect is irrelevant, it was to describe what the glass was, the is no intent of building a battle ship, perhaps just less likely to fall to prankster snots that dot local rivers.

    I'm confident I can do a ply or plank on frame.

    I don't think a 46" high cabin is so out of bounds on a garvey, 7 to 8 foot beam and around 20-24 feet in length.

    I've been told here that garveys can carry a load, if all the windows were used that's about 300 pounds, about what a heavy set bow babe might be (LOL) don't see an issue.

    More weight in the bottom and the higher CG shouldn't be a big issue of a heavier cabin.

    I'm open to other suggestions as to a layout, use of those windows as well, but they cannot be cut according to the glass company. :)
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You have more faith in the kids' aim than I do. Evidence shows, that that kind of people shoot randomly, sometimes in the general direction of their target. Other times, just in any direction..
     
  5. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Come on Gonzo, the bullet proof stuff is just an added benefit, it's not a primary concern, it's the size and weight primarily, structural glass that can bear some weight, the utilization of existing materials, design. I know you can point me in the right direction! LOL :)
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    To me, the right direction is to get rid of the windows and install plexiglass or lexan. It will be cheaper, easier and lighter. Further, they can be cut to a shape and size appropriate to the boat.
     
  7. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Well, that was the thought yesterday, :idea: after sleeping on it I see the light. It would take a very heavily built cabin to support those windows and you're right, in the end it would cost more than some lexan with a much lighter cabin.

    I'll save the windows for my bunker, LOL

    Thanks :)
     
  8. FAST FRED
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    The nicest to live with windows I have seen are the old style that drop down into the cabin side.

    They are in a track and simple leather belts lift them up as much as desired.

    A second track has the bug screen.

    With the inner wall of the house sealed the track and window is really simple to make water tight in its slide.Leaks go overboard.

    For your heavy window perhaps a house style counter weight could be worked in .
     
  9. daiquiri
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Just thinking out loud - don't know what your boat's GA and visual design look like, but perhaps you could somehow use those heavy and thick windows to create a nice-looking heat and sound-isolating box around the engine?

    Car makers use to make the beating heart of some of their supercars exposed and well-visible:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Yes Fred, such as the canal boats, I do like those and an arched top could be adapted to a Garvey. I prefer a pilot house style, but I'm not dead set on anything really.

    With your suggestion the sides would bear the weight and they would be much lower! :idea:

    Someone with more talent and better skills could probably build part of these windows below the water line!

    How about a glass bottom boat? LOL :cool:
     
  11. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    LOL!

    That would be a little overkill for a 10-20 hp OB. I have to remember to put Lambo doors on the cabin. :)
     
  12. daiquiri
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    Location: Italy (Garda Lake) and Croatia (Istria)

    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Oh, ok then. I had no idea about the looks and the size of your boat :p
     
  13. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Yes, I know, I'm at a disadvantage on this site, I can't get any pictures loaded and I know everyone (including me) likes pictures, they are worth a thousand words.

    I did add a ink above and described which boat I'm most interested in. So far I haven't found plans and I've been told there aren't any for that NJ Garvey.

    I can't go over 24 foot, beam needs to be less than 8 feet (6 to 7 is probably better). Work boat finish and plank/ply on frame.

    While Gonzo was ribbing me a bit I agree that trying to use these windows is problematic, they are large and heavy. I'm trying to picture Fred's suggestion and I think that would solve the height and weight issue.

    I guess nothing says the windows can't sit lower below deck and trim the glass as if they sat above deck, the lower glass could be covered.

    I need about 10 inches on both sides of the cabin to walk forward for docking.

    That gives me about 54 inches of bean in the cabin and at about 74 inches or 6' 2" of beam at the deck, more wouldn't hurt me.

    I'm assuming a mid/forward cabin.

    I don't want to duplicate things from another thread a "Smaller NJ Garvey" this should probably be moved, my bad! This just seemed like a window matter but it goes the the whole design.......and we don't have design plans!:confused:
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The weight of those glass panels would be more like 125 kg a piece, if the dimensions are accurate !
     

  15. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    That's about right, 55 pounds per window x 5, add 5 more pounds for each aluminum frame. So, when people and the dog get aboard the fat lady will need to sing at the dock. LOL
     
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