What wood for shell

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by cookebenjamin, Nov 3, 2015.

  1. cookebenjamin
    Joined: Nov 2015
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    Location: Clemson

    cookebenjamin New Member

    I am building a small Jon-boat but do not know what would be the best wood to cover the frame in. I have the frame of it built, I just need the shell of it and do not know what would be the best type of wood to use. I am currently in college and do not have a lot of money, so the cheapest suggestion would be most helpful
     
  2. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Best and Cheapest don't really match.
    Get the best plywood (exterior glue) you can afford and paint it well with oil based house paint.

    Did you do it from plans?
     
  3. cookebenjamin
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    cookebenjamin New Member

    I didn't get the plans from the internet, I just kinda sat down and designed them one day
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Go to Home Depot or Menard's and get underlayment for wet locations. Well painted will last for years. If you need thicker, #1 exposure starts at 3/8" to 3/4".
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If you use "Exposure 1" construction grade plywood, it'll delaminate, but if you use "Exterior" construction grade plywood, it will stay together. Exposure 1 grade is designed to tolerate an occasion rain shower, before the house wrap goes on, but not a soaking, while Exterior will tolerate a good soak.

    Assuming the typical sizes for a jon boat, you'll use 1/2" on the bottom and 1/4" or 3/8" on the sides. If your frame spacing is tight (less than 16" on center), you can use 3/8" on the bottom and 1/4" on the sides. What size and spacing are the frames? A small jon boat will use 1x3's or tapered 1x4's.
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    My dinghy is made of 3/16 underlayment. After a year outside it still has no delamination. the sides are 1/2" pine. No epoxy, only painted with leftover house paint.
     
  7. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I've seen "underlayment" done both ways, but "Exposure 1" isn't built as well as underlayment. Most underlayment is red shora (lauan) and has a WBP adhesive. APA Exposure 1 is Douglas fir and maybe it'll have WBP adhesive, but the defects, voids and repairs counts will be much higher with this grade.
     

  8. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Menards sells underlayment that shows no voids in the center laminate. I agree it is not the same quality as true marine plywood, but it sells for $7.50 a sheet.
     
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