What is the difference between "fixed fiddles" and "hinged fiddles?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by gp333, Feb 3, 2010.

  1. gp333
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    gp333 Junior Member

    What is the difference between "fixed fiddles" and "hinged fiddles?
     
  2. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    a fixed fiddle is a concrete double-bass.
     
  3. gp333
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    gp333 Junior Member

    pls explain more...
     
  4. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    A fiddle, as you no doubt know, is a guardrail used on a table during rough weather to prevent things from slipping off. They can be fixed in place or hinged so they can be lowered out of the way when not required.

    There's a pic of a fixed one here http://www.classicmarine.co.uk/prodtype.asp?prodtype=66&ph=cat

    I haven't found a pic for a hinged fiddle. They are used on cruise ships and liners so they can be out of sight in calm conditions and raised if weather is heavy enough that the ship's stabilizers can't handle the load, as sometimes happens in a storm (speaking from experience). They use neat hinges that allow the rail to vanish under the edge of the table.
     
  5. gp333
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    gp333 Junior Member

  6. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    No. I have not heard of a fiddle on a block, but I think it is the eyelet at the top. There is sometimes one at the bottom, called a becket. Try contacting the supplier.
     
  7. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    It just means the attachment point on the block's end is either swivelling or not.
     
  8. gp333
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    gp333 Junior Member

    heh I know this alone!

    I ask what is difference when I USE fixed and what when I use hinged fiddles!

    What happen if I use fixed fiddle (bad and good)?
    and
    What happen if I use hinged fiddle (bad and good)?

    And what are better for some purposes...
     
  9. jehardiman
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    jehardiman Senior Member

    Wether you need a fiddle block is a seperate question from wether you need a fixed or hinged strop.

    Fiddle block are used in rigging situation where the block must stay in the plane of the load and not capsize as a double block could when slacked, such as in multi-part topping lifts, backstay or preventer tackles, runners, etc.

    A hinged, or swliving strop, is used on a block normally mounted where the pull is not from a single plane. A fixed strop is used either when the direction of pull is fixed to a single plane, or the block is on a pendant.
     

  10. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    Right, and that should be obvious. So the word, "fiddle" needn't have been mentioned. The question ought to have read, "Why would one have a swivel on a block, and would a fixed eye sometimes be preferable?"
    A lot of the time, the situation doesn't call for anything more than a loop in the strop, called an eye. So the block in that case is less expensive and also more reliable without the complication of those extra parts.
     
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