what Glass matt to use ?

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Sergo, Sep 9, 2014.

  1. Sergo
    Joined: Sep 2014
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Mauritius

    Sergo New Member

    Hello everyone,

    This is my first post here so i ll introduce myself .
    Serge , based in Mauritius , I am building a Wharram tiki 26 in fiberglass .
    plugg is almost finished and mold should be ready in 10 days +/-

    I have used this methode as epoxy quality here is not good and shipping cost are high for hazrdous materiall.

    So on the tiki 26 built in GRP in the past they used
    Gelcoat, 200 gram powder bound CSM skin(tie coat),300/150 gram biaxial combination mat,Lantor Coremat XM 4mm, 300/150 gram biaxial combination mat.

    Not too keen on the coremat because heavy on resin + water absorbtion in case of breakage.

    So what would you recomand to use as glass matt and your observation ?

    Thank you in advance

    Serge
     
  2. garrybull
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 508
    Likes: 16, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 143
    Location: portsmouth england

    garrybull Senior Member

    the lay up on my boat which im currently building

    2 gelcoats
    1 x 450 mat
    1 x 600 mat
    2 x 600/300 combi mat
    1 x 450 mat in grey pigmented resin

    the above gives me an average of 11oz lay up but double on the bow sections and keels.

    very strong lay up.

    i have never used coremat in the lay up of a hull.

    i have used it it the lay up of a wheelhouse to build up the thickness.

    i do all my grp work with polyester resins etc.
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 15,187
    Likes: 923, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Actually polyester or vinylester are more of a Hazmat problem than epoxy. However, the plans should specify what materials and quantities (scantlings) to use. If you are changing them radically, it should be re-engineered.
     

  4. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 6,557
    Likes: 410, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 300
    Location: Spain

    TANSL Senior Member

    Watch out, let's be careful. The scantlings will not give you the material to use, nor amounts. The scantlings of a panel, for example, will give you, depending on the material you intend to use the minimum thickness it should have.
    If you have some plans in which you are given the materials used in each layer, use them, unless they are impossible to find. If this is the case, you tell us what the plans say, similar materials at your disposal, and maybe someone can tell you what combination to use.
    If you change even slightly, say only one layer, you can change the whole distribution of forces supported by each layer and thus make the whole not worth. Therefore, not only a big change requires recalculating the compounds, but any changes made. I will tell you all this if you want to do things correctly. If that does not matter for you, then follow any advice. But keep in mind that two different ships are not equal and that what applies to one does not have to serve for the other.
     
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