What could be an alternative construction of this yacht?

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by MONJI, Jun 25, 2006.

  1. MONJI
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: NZ

    MONJI Junior Member

    I've got a 7.8 trailer yacht.

    Hull/Deck construction method is 12mm strip planked cedar

    and double bios 400gm/m2 (45' Glass)

    What consturction(s) could be used for this yacht as alternative?

    It would be much appreciated, if somebody can help me out!

    Thank you : )

    Have a good day !
     
  2. Hunter25
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: Orlando

    Hunter25 Senior Member

    There are several methods you could use to build this boat. Many of these methods will not require displacement adjustments to account for weight, others may. There are several fiberglass techniques that could be used, several wooden methods and a few in metal. Since there are a couple dozen different ways to build, have you a method of interest? Keeping in mind, a major deviation from the construction method out lined in the plans, usually means you also need to redesign the structural pieces as well as the hull and deck. The result is a new boat that looks just like the original. Most designs have alternative building methods. Have you contacted the designer?
     
  3. MONJI
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    MONJI Junior Member

    its just for learning purpose. this task's been given by lecturer and the design has been given as well.

    Another question
    : What are te structural members of construction?

    it means like temporary frames?
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Are you using any scantling rules? These are a set of formulas that give you all the information you are asking for. Gerr has a failry easy to follow system.
     
  5. Hunter25
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: Orlando

    Hunter25 Senior Member

    I would double the comment for Geer's book "Elements of Boat Strength" as a good way to get an idea of the scantlings rules that can work for the most common building methods.

    There are many ways to construct a boat. Each material can have several different engineering methods involved in a particular design. All building materials need considerations for their strengths and weaknesses. This means a carvel planked wooden hull will require substantial internal framing, where a strip planked boat considerably less. Even though both are wooden construction, the methods are very different.

    The structural members of a boat vary from method to method and from material to material. Some boats have bent frames, others sawn, others none at all. Most boats have a keel, but some do not. The specifics of these are method and material dependant, designed into the structure, based on anticipated loads.
     

  6. Thunderhead19
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    Location: British Columbia, Canada

    Thunderhead19 Senior Member

    I like aluminium. For a one-of yacht, you can't really go wrong. As far as thge scantlings go, you could work out the scantlings on the boat you have, and convert them to alum EI=EI making sure to calculate the hull as a complete section first.
     
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