Wecboat : Wave Energy Converter Boat

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by WecBoat, Jul 4, 2014.

  1. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Windmills use to have very long blades and generally have the inductor in the axis of rotation of the blades. Have you thought about the consequences of having a weight, which is usually very large, at that point?. Have you thought of the oscillations that occur when the boat heels?. The larger waves are the more energy you can get from them, which is the main aim of your WecBoat, but also the stronger accelerations experienced by windmills and generators.
    I think you are indeed inventing something "different."
     
  2. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Sounds like you need pendulum power, like a bigger version of a grandfather clock. Only, instead of weights on chains and an escapement adding force to keep the pendulum in motion, use the wave motion as contrary to the pendulum.
     
  3. WecBoat
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    WecBoat Navy Blue

    Abstract

    Title: WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER FOR FLOATING STRUCTURE PROPULSION

    Abstract


    A method and apparatus for converting the waves energy into floating structure propulsion. The apparatus is a wave energy converter (WEC) for propulsion of floating structure that includes an arm pivotally positioned on a support connected to the floating structure, a generator and an electric motor positioned in the boat. The arm has a weight thereon. The boat is rotate by the wave energy.

    The method involves employing use of an arm as a stator and a boat as a rotor to efficiently convert the wave energy into propulsion.
     
  4. WecBoat
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    WecBoat Navy Blue

    We can think, for example, the keel of a sailboat been use for that.
     
  5. WecBoat
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    WecBoat Navy Blue

    Almost that. You are very good. Lets see the world up side down.
     
  6. WecBoat
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    That weight is in the bottom of the boat. Where, I think, it should be.
     
  7. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Well, if you had that weight (like a lead sailboat keel) hung as a pendulum between two catamaran hulls on a beam reach so you were rolling, and attached to that pendulum weight were some fins like used on various human powered boats? And more fins attached to the hulls, so one or the other was moving through the water, Might get some usable propulsion as the boat rolled or pendulum swung slowly back and forth., but only in certain size seas, and course restricted to abeam or nearly abeam.
    I can't see getting many watts if hooked to a generator unless the entire machine was huge, but then waves and their effect would be tiny by comparison.

    Imagine a dinghy and a supertanker in a 3 foot chop. Dangerously rough for one, unnoticeable in the other.
     
  8. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Might get some usable watts from a tug and tow from surge in towline, if the two were out of step. Not sure how you would do it. But the forces are there and wasted. If the tug was surfing down back of one sea, while barge buried her bow in face of another, you get MANY 100s of tons of shock on tow gear. Enough to part 3 inch diameter stainless tow wire. It's happened. That's why we adjust length of tow to be in step! :)
     
  9. WecBoat
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    WecBoat Navy Blue

    Pendulum are complicated aboard. They act like a crazy horse (power).
     
  10. WecBoat
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    I don't think it should be bigger the a regular fuel engine. For example, my 27 foot need 10 hp. 8 kw. A generator able to produce that load in not so huge, compare to a regular engine on a boat.
     
  11. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    Actually, we use pendulums aboard all the time. I judge if we are listing, by window sills. How much sea and sky I see from one side bridge compared to windows other side. I can visually detect a single degree of list. The engineer in engineroom doesn't have windows. He hangs a plumbob in center of a doorway and has calibration marks on bottom flange of door frame. A pendulum. Often when I ask them to straighten up the list, they want to argue the boat IS straight. I simply order them to transfer ballast till I say stop. I can tell better eyeballing 40 ft above sealevel, than he can measuring, below sealevel. :)
     
  12. WecBoat
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    WecBoat Navy Blue

    I am looking for something who can work in wave between 2 to 12 feet and survive 30 feet wave.

    Big boat will not be in the game. I need movement.
     
  13. Yobarnacle
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    Yobarnacle Senior Member holding true course

    I understood your size limitations. Converting the energy of a 1 ton to 3 ton boat rolling around in a few feet chop or a bit more, isn't going to convert to much electricity I think.
    I am suggesting direct propulsion by some means. Maybe fish style fins. The conversion losses converting to electricity and back again, are going to rob you of most of the usable power. IMO
     
  14. WecBoat
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    WecBoat Navy Blue

    Me too, I have a gimbaled stove ? Thanks gravity ! But my favorite is the hammock ! ;)
     

  15. bpw
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    bpw Senior Member

    Don't forget that (torque X rpm) / 63025 = HP

    Using wave motion you will be only working at about 4-10 cycles per minute, so you are going to need LOTS of torque to generate any sort of power. That means heavy weight and very strongly secured equipment.

    Think of it in reverse, if you geared a 10hp motor for 6rpm, that is a ballpark of the kinds of force you need to move your generator.

    Weights swinging around may also have some interesting free surface-like effects.
     
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