Waterprothing all under waterlevel seams/rivets from inside Aluminum hull

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by the brain, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. the brain
    Joined: Sep 2016
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    the brain Senior Member

    Waterproofng all under waterlevel seams/rivets from inside Aluminum hull


    My hull is actually in excellent condition there are no major dent/bings, no galvanic corrosion (this vessel was 100% of time in Great Lakes never Saltwater until know)


    however

    I do have a few questionable revits underwaterlevel for instance

    1.one is completely missing

    2.one has been relaced w/ a what is now a rusted stainsteel screw

    3.there are a few revits which are tight however now I can fit my finginernail under

    These revit.

    4.I have had welding done to the outside transome for trim tab/transducer mounts and I’m concerned that when the transome lower seams was exposed to heat it could have

    Worn the seal.

    5.the forword inside lower keel has a major spot of rust about 12” long 3” wide

    I plan to steel wool this then coat everything w/ Goop coat it.https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004IPC28G/ref=ox_sc_act_title_3?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

    I also ordered this G Flex Liquid Epoxy Resin and Hardener https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=8694&familyName=WEST+System+G%2Fflex+Liquid+Epoxy+Kits


    I will be removing deck/floatation and clean aluminum w/ my portable steamer and use simple green full strenght
    My portable steamer is basically my bathroom cleaner/stanitizer.
    (not a actually preasure washer I do have access to to a PW)

    The hard part to clean will be under the inside chines around the revit I want the goop to drip down around the revit shaft.


    The goop instructions state to acid wash the aluminum w/ naval jelly pirior to appleing the goop however the naval jelly lable states not to use on aluminum so this is why I’m using simply green.


    Hopefully I will like the results of the sealing capability’s of the goop It was certainly less expensive than shipping Gulvit w/ it’s associated additional hazards ship fee.


    Initiale observation the goop 2LB container is rather small they claim 2LB covers 20square feet is a bit of an exaggeration.


    I was planning to completely cover rear transome seam first w/ bow up.

    Then just dab a blob on each cleaned revit or should I completely cover inside of hull?


    The outside temps. Are in mid to lower 50-60s

    Thanks for any tips on this sealing.
     

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  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Steel wool will leave residue that will cause galvanic corrosion in salt water.
     
  3. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Blueknarr Junior Member


    Just a few thoughts

    1 it is better to prevent water from entering than to control where it goes after.
    Sealing from inside doesn't prevent water corrosion under sealant.

    2 no mention of replacing questionable rivets.

    3 stealwool leaves a rustable mess of micro strands. Nylon scotch-bright style pads don't

    4 naval jelly is often used as cleaner/polisher of metal. Its phosphoric acid etches aluminum rather than polish. Thus the warning on label. The goop needs a clean and etched surface to adhere to. Thus it's labelling.

    Paul
     
  4. kapnD
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    kapnD Senior Member

    Why wouldnt you replace the leaking/missing rivets with new rivets?
    If the holes are corroded, redrill and go up in size.
    Maybe your hull doesn’t like going over 50!
     
    the brain likes this.
  5. the brain
    Joined: Sep 2016
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    the brain Senior Member

    I have been able to control the seeping water for the last 15 or so trips seeping has progressively increased no dought the beating and banging the hull is subjected to will loosen a revit or two this vessel is 40 years old but still in very good shape.

    the 50Plus was during Lake shakedown runs runs w/ a 14.5"X21 P prop speed has been signficantly reduced to mid to upper 40s w/ a 14.5X19P w/ more lower gunt, still cummie fuel milage. still ironing out small tuning in.

    I'll have to elevate the vessel off the trailer to be able to fully inspect the loose revits.

    TB
     

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  6. the brain
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    the brain Senior Member

    OK I'll use naval jelly I guess a apply a small blob on each revit? then rinse w/ steamer gun then west G2 all around revit head then cover whole bottom w/ goop.
    Thanks TB
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2017
  7. the brain
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    the brain Senior Member

    how about a small sandpaper flap wheel for dremel tool clean/sand around loose revit from outside then G2.

    I believe the lower outside triple row of revits the center revit is a weak spot and will be an enfothies on this area,

    after stripping the underneth enmale paint plan to recover exposed alumimin w/ this primer
    TotalBoat Aluminum Boat Barrier Coat Epoxy Primer https://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/product.do?process=checkout&part=498240
     

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  8. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
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    Blueknarr Junior Member


    Yes, scouring pads can be attached to drills. Have never seen stealwool on drill, did you mean to use a wire wheel?

    I would not coat entirely. In my experience, coatings over aluminum allow corrosion to form in seen. I have seen great damage from unnoticed and hense ignored corrosion. IMO the best way to prevent corrosion or Roy damage is thru frequent inspections. Any surface treatment (carpet, paint or gloop) that inhibits inspection invites problems.
     

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  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A lot of aluminum boats would be rotting at their seams if this was actually the case. In general it's the quality of the coating that makes the difference, assuming it's applied properly. This typically means an etched primer, followed by a top coat that's actually waterproof.

    I've seen some successes with backyard jobs using polyurea , polyurethanes and epoxy. These often tend to go on quite thick and with a lot of texture, though can be smoothed up to some degree, with application techniques or buffing afterward. They also add a fair bit of weight, particularly some of the "reinforced" poly's. If the boat can tolerate this extra weight and you don't have much of a budget, spray some truck bed liner (usually a polyurethane) on the outside and call it a day.
     
  10. portacruise
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    portacruise Senior Member

    Agree with kapnD, replace rivets. I wouldn't want any acid remaining on the inside of the hull when etching. Maybe use a dremel tool that fits into the rivet hole to roughen the surface?

    PC
     
  11. the brain
    Joined: Sep 2016
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    the brain Senior Member

    update found 4 completely missing rivets all in the lower outside triple row of revits the center revit broke.

    other slithly loose revits where toward foward bow area the majority of revets are in excellent shape.

    been sealing from outside some questionable freeboard/also below waterline, slithly loose revits w/ West sys. G2 also sealed lower transome seal from inside and outside. very strong glue
    however it turns into a yellow drip.

    will replace missing revits w/ same size then cover w G2.

    boat recently was swamped all battery sulfuric acid emptied (battery wasn't in it's container) now has left a white thick layer of corrosion inside hull I scraped and vacumned will try simple green to clean it's a mixture of oil/dirt/Roy

    then tilt vessel star/port seal both side seals.

    I like the G2 it apparently seeps/seals then strenghtens the subtrate

    thinking of glueing stringers directly to hull.
     

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    Last edited: Nov 18, 2017
  12. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Are you sealing against corrosion or trying to seal leaking rivets?

    Leaking rivets require repair; not overcoating, find a reputable marine repair guy with rivet tools.

    If you are trying to fix corrosion on the interior; I'd probably use something like ACF 50, but I might do some cleaning and light sanding first. Since the ACF50 isn't 2 part; you can do a section at a time; much easier as well.. That goop/epoxy sealer is never going to get under the stringers and frames, so you'll basically be coating over a rivet that someday might need repair; then the water will seep under the reinforcement frame/stringer and you won't even know which rivet is leaking without a haulout and bilge fill with water. At least without the goop; you could see a leaky rivet without a haulout and filling the bilge with water. The goop is a bad idea friend. It can't seal the rivets because it can only seal the rivet on top, but not in between what has been riveted! Please don't do it. For minor aluminum repair; you can use a melt on product. A friend of mine said you can overcoat leaking rivets with it, but I wouldn't. I think 3M makes the same thing, but it must not be proprietary.

    CABELA'S ALUMINUM BOAT PATCH : Cabela's http://www.cabelas.com/product/Cabelas-Aluminum-Boat-Patch/533864.uts

    Slow down and avoid pounding boat n crew. Riveted boats ain't made for lotsa pounding.
     
  13. the brain
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    the brain Senior Member

    some times in ruff water more often lately you don't have a choice to not treat the hull rudely.

    I did know of one missing revit under water line now I have a few more this treating the hull rudely will be minimized so more rivets won't fall out.

    the G2 is a liquid glue it's supposed to seep down inside the revit. the pasht meaded stuff you link to is a tempuary fix that will dry up and pop off the first wave it hits. the G2 is a flexible glue so it flexes at each wave,
    https://www.walmart.com/ip/Closed-E...-16-Diameter-376-500-Grip-25-Pieces/129679075
     
  14. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I don't doubt the stuff I linked to is a question mark. I said I wouldn't use it for rivet repair.

    You need to repair the rivets properly and be as nice as possible to the hull. Welded aluminum hulls and well built glass hulls can take the pounding better. I have an riveted aluminum boat 30 years old; no leaks, but to be honest, I baby it cuz my back is bad and I can't take the pounding either.

    Forget my comment about the quick aluminum stick repair, but take some good advice here. I can't see how the goop gets inside flange recesses to the hull opens and seals anything. I'd bet a hundo after you use the goop; the boat still leaks.

    Maybe another poster can explain it to me.
     

  15. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I made a drawing for you to explain the problem with the flange recesses

    boat leak.jpg
     
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