venting a portable petrol/gas tank

Discussion in 'Outboards' started by valvebounce, May 19, 2015.

  1. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 549
    Likes: 11, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 124
    Location: manchester uk

    valvebounce Senior Member

    I have a perfectly serviceable tank,it is made of steel.(Made in the USA)
    The cap has a perspex cover to enable the amount of fuel guage to be seen.
    The perspex got damaged,which made it no longer waterproof.
    I managed to find a see through plastic cap that fits over it.I fitted it with fine screws and epoxy resin.It is the blade and float type,I re- calibrated the blade and float,so it works great.
    The unfortunate thing is,the cap is no longer vented.
    I saw an idea on how to vent the tank by using a car tyre valve.
    Drill a hole 11.5 mm in the tank then pull a car valve into it,then remove the schraeder core,and use the dust cap to vent it.
    Anybody done it?
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Vents on fuel tanks are of the mushroom type. That is, they will vent gasses but won't let water get in (within limits). You could find an old or new gas cap and take the vent off. That would be easier and safer.
     
  3. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 549
    Likes: 11, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 124
    Location: manchester uk

    valvebounce Senior Member

    I thought of using a piece of flexi-pipe on the valve,and having it pointing downwards to prevent water ingress.
    The problem with a gas tap would be that it needs a boss to screw into,which would have to be fitted in the tank to take the tap.
    I think most threaded bosses are fitted before the two tank halves are fitted together.The problem would be access thro' the tank filler hole to fit a threaded boss.
    Thanks for your opinion Gonzo,the safety aspect is definitely worth consideration.
    V
     
  4. SukiSolo
    Joined: Dec 2012
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    Location: Hampshire UK

    SukiSolo Senior Member

    Most people have the newer plastic tanks as they do not rust inside like the older steel ones. Definitely worth chasing some rowing clubs, sailing clubs or watersports centres, to see if they are binning an old steel tank. There are not too many left but they are out there. As Gonzo says, a lot easier to just replace the cap with a good one from a rusty tank....;)

    BTW always test the breather hole actually works. I've known it block on both metal and plastic types. Most likely spiders and other small creatures finding a home and dirt/sludge getting in there. A little compressed air and sometimes some carb cleaner will shift it.
     

  5. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
    Posts: 549
    Likes: 11, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 124
    Location: manchester uk

    valvebounce Senior Member

    Hi SS,
    This is a Chrysler tank,it's immaculate inside,It's a good shape with a carrying handle.I have a couple of plastic tanks,but this one will go with my classic 18hp Evinrude engine.
    I have recently had my 6hp Evinrude serviced,it ran great in the chandlers.
    I got it home and connected it to one of my plastic tanks and it was a pain to start.The pump up bulb would not re-inflate,I removed the cap and that was the problem.When I blew in the vent on the cap it seemed clear,yet if I re-fitted it and used the vent the bulb would not re-inflate.I think I will take the vent screw out completely and have a look at it.
     
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