use fiberglass mandrel to build large boat building parts?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by pipe dream, May 6, 2017.

  1. pipe dream
    Joined: May 2017
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    Location: oahu

    pipe dream New Member

    Can someone please keep my dream alive?

    So take a look at Adastra from forward of the the bow, and tell me if you could realize the potential to build a similar boat from large diameter fiberglass pipes laid from a mandrel cut in half.


    keel of Vaka main hull one long pipe cut in half longitudinally

    main hull freeboard and akas are much larger pipes cut in half. ring frames built in on the mandrel

    amas are smaller full circumference pipes or reverse curve panels of the aka

    is solid glass to heavy? if so can we even lay some glass on the mandrel , bed core on it , and then lay more glass?

    I have a pipe dream of building the boat i can not really afford.
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You will need to build proper molds to get the right shape. If the material for the hull is more than you can afford, the total boat is beyond your means. The hulls are maybe 10-15% of the total cost. Solid fiberglass will produce a really heavy boat. Also, you need a set of plans with properly engineered laminate schedule, structural details, etc.
     
    philSweet likes this.
  3. waikikin
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Australia

    waikikin Senior Member

    Hi Pipe Dream,

    I think you should do it, the McConaghy Boats https://www.mcconaghyboats.com/adastra looks very groovy, you should build one at a scale size to test your concepts, the designer Kurt Hughes likes people to build boats larger than they can afford, his cylinder molding might have some merit in your application for hulls & amas plus might do other portions as well
    Very large boats like adastra and similar "super" boats often get sold a few years later at a big discount.. maybe wait;)

    All the best from Jeff
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I think a designer that likes people to build boats larger than they can't afford is giving really bad advice. An honest designer will discuss a building and maintenance budget with the customer and stay within it.
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2017
  5. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    As I understand the work of the designer, he must design the ship that the customer asks for. The work of evaluating the material, human or financial means of the client, in my opinion, is not a function of the designer, however honest he may be. Now, yes, he will need to make sure that the client can pay for the project he ordered
     
  6. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Not really. If a customer goes to a designer with a budget and the designer sells him something that can't be built within it, he is not being honest. The cost of the materials and labor are part of the design.
     

  7. TANSL
    Joined: Sep 2011
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Of course. Who says no?. But the designer can not, should not, stop making a design because the client does not have the means to carry it out.
    And the client is in his right to buy the project that he likes, if he has the money to buy it (buy the project).
     
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