Unburnt fuel in four stroke marine diesel engine

Discussion in 'Diesel Engines' started by manon, Feb 18, 2019.

  1. manon
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 88
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: dhaka

    manon Junior Member

    Good day everyone,

    I am working on the establishment of EEDI for inland cargo ships of Bangladesh. In the process of the establishment, I need to know the amount of unburnt diesel. Before any further experiment regarding this, I want to study well to get myself prepared (I never worked what happens inside the engines............so, you guess).

    I this regard, I seek your help. It would be a great help if you guys help me out regarding the above mentioned issue. Reference of books and journal paper will be more helpful.

    Regards,
    S.M. Rashidul Hasan
    Naval Architect, Bangladesh
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,534
    Likes: 368, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Do the engines have flow meters? I assume that you start with a known amount of fuel.
     
  3. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
    Posts: 655
    Likes: 75, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Columbus, GA

    JamesG123 Senior Member

    My take is he is trying to implement some kind of emissions testing for marine diesels. Not sure if he's looking for recommendations on a DIY (sounds like) or a packaged commercial solution (expensive). Outside my wheelhouse. Hopefully there will be others here who are on one side or the other of this industry.
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,534
    Likes: 368, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    In that case he needs a gas analyzer that is calibrated for the gasses of interest, and to take samples of particulates and analyze those too. It doesn't matter what happens internally in the engines. You only need to research what is in the exhaust. As with any test, you need to develop a protocol that will provide a way to compare various engines at different operating conditions with whatever your emission standards are. It is a rather expensive project if you start from scratch. I would recommend you look at standards from other countries that can be used.
     
  5. manon
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 88
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: dhaka

    manon Junior Member

    Gonzo and JamesG123,

    Thanks for your response and pardon me as I could not explain my problem clearly.

    First, I started with testing marine diesel sample to find the carbon content (It varies in our country at the service tanks due to the mixing of impurities in some cases). When I have the carbon content, I used the Energy Based Approach to find the CO2 emission.

    At this point, I was suggested to use exhaust gas analyzer (Gonzo, you also have pointed out the same). Before using that, I was bit curious, whether I can find any experiment papers, that gives results of combustion in a four stroke marine diesel engine. Does a four stroke marine diesel engine (Yanmar, Weichai, Cummings, Usual RPM range 1200-1800, BHP: 300-1200) burns all the injected fuel? If not, what is the usual %. I was looking for the references.

    Thanking you
    Manon
    Bangladesh
     
  6. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
    Posts: 655
    Likes: 75, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Columbus, GA

    JamesG123 Senior Member

    Is this a government agency program? Private company? Or scientific research project?

    There are diesel exhaust gas analyzers that will give the mixtures of O2, CO, CO2, and nitrogen compounds that I think will meet what you are asking for. The difference is of course the quality (and cost) of the instruments, and also how well calibrated and how accurate they are. Which is what makes my above questions important to know.

    There are lots of references available via web search. If I understand your goals, I don't think you really need to delve to much into internal combustion theory and engineering, just interpreting what comes out of the dirty end of a tailpipe.
     
  7. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,534
    Likes: 368, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The emissions of engines are published by the manufacturers. You can test the engines in use, however you would also have to test the condition of the engine. That is, the compression ration, how much oil is being passed through piston rings, valve stems, etc. This would only make sense if you are trying to test whether existing ships comply with regulations. It is common in many countries to have cars pass emission testing every year.
     
  8. manon
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 88
    Likes: 0, Points: 6, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: dhaka

    manon Junior Member

    Dear Gonzo and James,

    Thanks for your valuable comments. I think, I got a guideline here, which I have to work a bit more.

    Thanks again.

    Cheers
    /Manon
     

  9. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
    Posts: 655
    Likes: 75, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Columbus, GA

    JamesG123 Senior Member

    I'm glad we could "help". LOL.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.