Ultims 2018-2019

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Dolfiman, Mar 29, 2018.

  1. Dolfiman
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    Dolfiman Senior Member

    I propose you a common thread on the Ultims which are now in the same 2 years cycle, preparing the same big events, La route du Rhum 2018, Round the world 2019. They are 5 in concurrence with equivalent potential for a win (boat and sailor) : Macif / F.Gabart, Idec sport / F.Joyon, Gitana 17 / S. Josse, Sodebo / T. Coville, Banque Populaire 9 / Armel Le Cleac'h. So may be it is easier now to concentrate the info and comments on them and the coming races.

    I start with this news dated 15 march about Macif on-going upgrade (in French unfortunately), quite heavy modifications as the re launch is expected for June. 3 axis : lighter boat, aerodynamic, new foils.
    Le trimaran MACIF dans une nouvelle dimension ? - Macif Course au Large https://www.macifcourseaularge.com/actus/trimaran-macif-nouvelle-dimension/
     
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  2. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Good idea, Dolfiman. Though I think ,perhaps, the technical changes to any of these boats might also be recorded in their individual threads. The Macif article is disappointing in that they are not specific about what changes they're making with the foils-for instance will they use a daggerboard lifting foil? I guess we'll know soon enough........
     
  3. Dolfiman
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    Dolfiman Senior Member

    This news here after (posted yesterday) is about Gsea design activity within Macif upgrade, an engineering office specialised on structural aspects with composite materials. They mention reinforcement of the amas ("flotteurs") and the akas ("bras") in order to put larger more powerful foils, but no mention of the central hull (?) . I quote : "The purpose is to further increase the preponderance of the flight mode on the use of the boat", which I interpret as more time with higher ratio of foil assist, not full flying.
    3 questions à… GSea Design - Macif Course au Large https://www.macifcourseaularge.com/actus/3-questions-a-gsea-design/

    As regard Banque Pop 9, in Voile magazine of march, reporter on board said that the full flying mode triggered at around 27 Knots (speed boat), then speed easily jumps to the 35-41 Knots zone.
     
  4. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Interesting. If I remember correctly, Verdier said Gitana 17 should begin full flying at about 17 knots boat speed. I can see the exact threshold of full foiling being a big deal in many races-sure will be exciting to see these flying beasts compete with each other.
    Verdier was quoted as saying the boat would foil in winds between 16 and 25 knots. He made an estimate of top speed at around 54 knots before cavitation became a major factor. He stressed that top speed was not the goal but a high average speed was.
    ============================
    CORRECTION: My memory was incorrect. I went back and read everything in the Gitana thread until I found this quote from an interview Guillaume did with a French mag:
    Voilesetvoiliers.com: Rumors speak about the speed of 55 knots for this boat ...
    GV:
    This is not what we are looking for. We first want high average speeds. The boat can take off around 27 knots of speed while sailing 60 ° from the wind. It goes two and a half times faster than the wind so it will take off as soon as there is 13 to 14 knots of wind speed. Anyway, we made choices but we are limited by cavitation. She blocks us. If we really wanted to go faster, we would have to accept being penalized in low speeds and moments of transition. This is not our choice. Going to 55 knots is not a goal in itself ... even if it would be funny ( laughs)). We are not looking for ultimate performance but good averages. The state of the sea will play a determining role. We will discover all this!
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2018
  5. fastsailing
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    fastsailing Junior Member

    Doesn't make sense.
    Surely that boat can achieve 17 knots boatspeed in less than 10 knots of true wind in optimal point of sail.
    If takeoff boatspeed is 27 knots instead, that true wind range is far more believable. 16 knots true at optimal point of sail, gradually increasing to 25 knots at less favorable point of sail.
     
  6. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Thanks, fastsailing-I went back to find an interview with Guillaume Verdier and corrected my previous post.
     
  7. Dolfiman
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    Dolfiman Senior Member

    Some news about the programme of the coming Nice Ultimed end of April-beginning of May, the first time Ultims will race in Mediterranean seas. This programme is arranged so that a maximum of people can see them in action (Frenchs from Marseille to Nice, but also Monaco, Italians from the near frontier and from Sardinia, Spanishes from Balearic Islands) through 2 prologues and a great race with compulsory way points that will oblige the Ultims to steer around markers very near to the coasts. By hoping a lot of people can go and see them, all access will be free :
    Nice UltiMed - Route http://www.niceultimed.com/en/route/route
     
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  8. Dolfiman
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    Dolfiman Senior Member

    Banque Pop IX.jpg Photos of the Ultims are now posted in Nice "Promenade des anglais" for the promotion of the event, I like this one highlighting the scale of Ban que Populaire IX;
     
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  9. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Huge!
     
  10. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

  11. Dolfiman
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    Dolfiman Senior Member

    Ah... terrible news ! Fortunately there are safe but what a misfortune for the boat development.
     
  12. Dolfiman
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    Dolfiman Senior Member

    Update - 4.30 pm (French hour) :
    "Following the capsizing of the Maxi Banque Populaire IX last night, the crew was evacuated early in the afternoon by helicopter hoist by the Moroccan army. Armel Le Cléac'h, Pierre Emmanuel Hérissé and the cameraman arrived in Casablanca where they were taken care of by the Consulate of France. More information in the coming hours with the first words of Armel."
     
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  13. Corley
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    Corley epoxy coated

    A rough translate of an update that was posted on the capsize:

    Premiers mots d’Armel Le Cléac’h suite au chavirage du Maxi Banque Populaire IX http://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/news/premiers-mots-darmel-le-cleach-suite-au-chavirage-du-maxi-banque-populaire-ix

    #Ultime #Ultim' #ITW #Chavirage

    Armel le cléac' h skipper of popular bank ix returns to the circumstances of the chavirage.

    Armel Le Cleac' H: " this night we sailed port amure towards cadiz. We've been gone since Tuesday from lorient, we had made a big edge along Portugal. To Train, we went to find a crossing point in the north west of the Canary Islands. We were on our way back to cadiz to pick up the crew for the rest of the program. The Sea and wind conditions were rather correct. We had 18/20 wind knots at the time of the incident. The Sea was a little formed because the wind had been supported for quite some time on Western Portugal. When we went down to the canaries, we had a strong wind up to 40-45 knots. We were on a pretty tight edge, near débridé, a laugh in the grand and petit. I had done the routages and over the hours the wind had to mollir. The conditions were pretty stable, I checked and there was no grain or storm in front of us. Pierre-Emmanuel Hérissé (the technical director of the people's bank team) and our media-man were inside, I was in my cabin on standby. I was lying down for five minutes on the bannette to start a nap. The boat started getting up very quickly after a wind storm, I didn't have time to get out. I was able to shock the big sail, but it wasn't enough. Everything went very fast, the boat swung on the starboard side. I found myself upside down in the water that flooded the cabin. Pierre-Emmanuel was calling to see if I was there. We were able to hear between two waves, I managed to get out of there and hoist myself in the central hull safe with them, safe. We immediately made a point to make sure no one was hurt. I quickly triggered the distress beacon to alert the authorities. We brought the security equipment together and we put on our survival suits. I contacted Ronan Lucas (the director of the popular bank team) by the portable iridium that was in the can of survival to tell him that we were all on board and especially that there was no hurt. Two hours later, a freighter arrived on the area, and we switched with them by VHF. It was dark, we couldn't get out of the boat immediately. The day got up, a patrol boat was supposed to meet us at the end of the day, but finally a National Navy helicopter was able to take off from Casablanca this afternoon to pick us up. Upon Arrival, one after another, we climbed into the helicopter and landed at the military port of Casablanca on a frigate. We have been very well received by the Moroccan National Navy, we have been able to eat and do some health checks, we thank them for everything and the crew of the helicopter. We were then taken over by the French Consulate. It's really hard to live, sea conditions were easy to handle, we've already sailed before under much stronger and committed conditions. Everything changed in seconds. In my opinion, it's connected to a wind overbooking. At the time we left the boat, the three hulls and arms were intact, the mast for him, is broken into several pieces " a race against the watch is now engaged to recover the ship as soon as possible and all In order to be at the start of the rum road in November."
     
  14. Dolfiman
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    Dolfiman Senior Member

    Thanks for these info, ...so just a gust of wind in manageable conditions !!! Now the challenge to recover and refit the boat in the coming months to be ready for the La route du Rhum in October !
     
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  15. Dolfiman
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    Dolfiman Senior Member

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