Truck diesels

Discussion in 'DIY Marinizing' started by parkland, Nov 7, 2012.

  1. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    Location: canada

    parkland Senior Member

    I was thinking of using a truck diesel for my boat, when I build it.
    I don't know why this isn't more common.

    Engines like an international dt360 or international dt466 are wet sleeve engines, and they are meant for continuous power.
    They only make like 180 -230 hp stock, but they are super tough, and cheap to boot!
    [​IMG]

    They are known for reliability, fuel mileage, and durability. They are also in tractors, and guys modify them to put down 3000 hp in the racing world.
    They have SAE # 2 bolt patterns.

    I would send off the exhaust manifold to be ceramic coated, at swain industries, so the manifold would not give off as much heat.
    And I'm thinking I could use the stock water pump, and find a heat exchanger and fresh water pump.
    Or better yet, utilize the stock water pump, and put a pipe in the water, as a keel cooler type system.

    These engines can be bought running from 1000-4000$, and rebuild kits cost 1500$ right from international. I would buy a low priced core, and rebuild it... new injectors etc.

    What transmissions might bolt onto these, and what issues might I run into?
     
  2. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Good looking engine. I like a diesel that look like a diesel. There are a few websites around in which guys only talk diesel. I think one is called Marinediesle dot com or something. Might do some googling for advice .

    The old Mercedes OM 427 and OM 447 straight six is also a fantastic engine. Very common as a marine engine, used in buses. If you come across one grab it.
     

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  3. keysdisease
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    The Cummins 6BT used in Dodge Trucks is a commonly marinized engine. Depending on the year the HP ranges from 180 to over 240HP. The later models are electronic.
    Marine parts like wet exhaust manifolds, water pumps, etc are readily available as these truck engines are identical to their marine counterparts.
    In some of the local "recycling centers" these engines sell for as little as $2,000

    Steve
     
  4. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    parkland Senior Member

    If you think it's good looking, you should see one thats been sandblasted and painted black.... the word is SEXY !!! lol.

    I like the DT engines because they are cheap, and really good engines.
    Aslo very popular, unlike the mercedes engines. (here, anyways.)
     
  5. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    parkland Senior Member

    An INTL DT engine is a lot tougher than a cummins though, and also wet sleeve, meaning it can be rebuilt many times without needing a new block.

    If you like the 5.9 cummins, you'd LOVE the DT engines, they are similar but better.

    Also though the truck 5.9 is not a marine 5.9, different pistons and HG I think.
     
  6. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    It is --extremely common.

    Lancingmarine.com in UK sells everything to marinize most engines.

    Maybe not the one your doing but sexy is not a requisite. Ford are very popular marinization
     
  7. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Or better yet, utilize the stock water pump, and put a pipe in the water, as a keel cooler type system.


    On our 6-71 the keel cooling is a length of galvanised 1 1/2 pipe (20 ft) run outside , an elbow a close nipple and elbow and another 20 ft pipe run back.

    This is plenty of cooling for most uses

    BUT , you must put in a bypass thermostat , or the engine will be over cooled.

    The stock thermostat helps stabilize operation but can not cope with return water that is 40-100 deg below the exit temp.

    The Intl 360 and 466 are usually overlooked as conversions , tho they are probably 3x as strong in life time hours as pick up truck engines.

    The Mechanical 360 or 466 is My Favorite , the electronic is not possible for me to service.

    There are companies that will build a very efficient custom heat shield that is laced on .

    Any truck muffler (or two) will reduce the exhaust , but if QUIET!! is desire google Hospital critical silencers , for the best ,,,tho heavy.
     
  8. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    parkland Senior Member


    My favorite too.

    That is what I would use.

    You can even get steel crowned pistons for the 466, but I don't even think it is necessary.
    These engines are TOUGH !!
     
  9. Milehog
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: NW

    Milehog Clever Quip

    I've no experience with the DT 360 but the DT 466 is a very good engine, much better than the Cat 3208 IMO.
     
  10. parkland
    Joined: Jul 2012
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    Location: canada

    parkland Senior Member

    The dt360 is 5.9 liter i6, and much tougher than a 5.9 cummins.
     
  11. MikeJohns
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    MikeJohns Senior Member

    The most reliable engines we have used so far are real industrial/agricultural ( not truck engines) A good choice is the John Deere 6068 They can get up to 25 000 hrs on a commercial coastal fishing boat or small trawler before rebuild and are rebuilt in around 8 hours in situ.

    The Cummins B and C series were no where near so tough, not even the detroits lasted as well as the more modern work horses. I've seen a few international agricultural engines in boats but they don't have the advantage of having a factory build marine version as JD do.
     
  12. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Don't forget the 6BT was around for years in industrial use before being put into trucks...so is it an industrial or truck engine?

    Yes they are great engines,but use wet sleeves and can have issues with cavitation-leading to sleeve leakage.

    Rebuilding is easier and yes it can be rebuilt many times...but how are you going to put 100,000 hours on one? It's like having a the world's fastest car but never going over 60.
    I have seen an unopened 6BT with 10,000 hours (but had gone for a swim) with no cylinder ridging-given a quick hone,and was good to go.

    At any rate,unless you are doing 1000 hours a year fishing,for recreational guys like us putting on maybe 100 hours a year...taken care of these engines will outlast us by decades.
     
  13. slow fred
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    slow fred Junior Member

    I had a work boat with D-342 Cats. One went down with a blown head gasket at 42,000 hrs. Both were pulled at that time and replaced with 3126 Cats. They will never last like the 342s.
     
  14. MikeJohns
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    Location: Australia

    MikeJohns Senior Member

    W VH

    Liners are replaced for damage just as commonly as for wear.
    In the leisure arena more marine engines are re-sleeved following a small amount of salt water in one or more cylinders. And it's probably the main cause of re-building leisure boat engines.

    The cost of re-sleeving a dry sleeved engine is considerable and needs a well equipped engine machine shop. Wet sleeves can be replaced by anyone with basic tools with the engine in the boat. That's a real boon for both the do it yourself mechanic, and for the less savvy owner if the boat is in a remote cruising area.

    Wet sleeve engines will last just as long as dry sleeved. They are very long lasting providing you use decent coolant, that's all. There are plenty of ford wet sleeved 6 cyl diesels still in great shape after 40 years in boats, the leaky seals through corroded seats are nearly always due to leaky coolant systems (due to poor maintenance) continually topped up with tap water, and no thought to adding anti corrosive coolant admix.

    As for hours: Australian boats going overseas, or extensively touring the Pacific can rack up a staggering amount of hours over a few years. You start here with 2 thousand on the clock and by the time you get to the UK ( half way) you've added another 5 thousand in under three years. Long distance cruisers reliant on diesel propulsion can easily put commercial hours on an engine.
     

  15. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: Vancouver

    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    ..but what % of leisure boats at the docks actually do these trips?
     
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