Trimaran outboard motor question.

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by SpiritWolf15x, Jun 2, 2010.

  1. SpiritWolf15x
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    SpiritWolf15x Senior Member

    Hey everyone, I'm trying to figure out which side to put my motor bracket on, port or starboard.

    My father said port was the way to go, but I see some tri's with the motor on starboard.

    Please help clarify this as my brain is starting to hurt.

    -Wolf
     
  2. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Are you right handed? If yes then on the port side

    Richard Woods
     
  3. Stumble
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    Stumble Senior Member

    In the middle is preferable. If that isn't an option then I doubt it really matters to be honest.
     
  4. marshmat
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    marshmat Senior Member

    One side of the outboard will have a lever or pin that you flip to tilt the engine up. I'd prefer to have that side of the motor facing the main hull. But I doubt it really matters all that much.
     
  5. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    If it has tiller steering put it where the tiller makes the most sense.
     
  6. SpiritWolf15x
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    SpiritWolf15x Senior Member

    Thanks for the input everyone. You were all very helpful
     
  7. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    bruceb Senior Member

    check it first

    I have had more trouble with tilted motors than in their running position. Check for tiller interference and prop clearance in every possible position- it will happen at the worst time. Also, many 4 stroke engines do not like to be tilted too close to level, which can cause the lower section to drag at speed. Most small outboards are designed with their tiller on port so that a person can sit on the port side of a small power boat and steer with their right hand. It is not an issue for most tris. Bruce
     
  8. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Just to clarify my first reply.

    Few trimarans fit the outboard directly on the transom, because of the potential rudder hitting problem that Bruceb mentioned.

    So they are offset port and starboard. Thus from the cockpit they will be behind and probably below you as you start them or adjust the controls, never mind refuelling or changing engine oil or sparkplugs. It is very rare to sit next to the engine and hold the tiller arm, so it's totally unlike an open boat.

    Visualize facing aft and working on an engine mounted to starboard. You have to do all the work with your left hand. Whereas mounted to port your right hand can easily reach all parts without twisting your body.

    That's why I said mount an engine on the port side if you are right handed. Like Farriers, Dragonflies and all the rest do.

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  9. Chris Ostlind

    Chris Ostlind Previous Member

    The business of having it on the starboard, or port, side is going to involve the twisting of your body, maybe squatting in a weird way, maybe kneeling and hanging over something, maybe crossing your body with one arm, the use of creative tool making... who knows, as there are many dozens of engine/boat combos out there already and dozens more that have yet to be tried.

    If it turns out that you are having real issues with your initial location, simply move it to another.

    Bottom line, Wolf, is that it's your boat and you can put the motor/mount anywhere you like as long as it still performs its task and doesn't hamper the operation of the boat.
     
  10. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    If the motor is mounted forward of the transom on the beam the tiller location does matter if you aren't using remote controls. If you have to work on your motor with the boat in the water being able to put a dinghy underneath it can save some hard to retrieve parts if they drop.
     
  11. Chris Ostlind

    Chris Ostlind Previous Member

    So, you say and that might work for you. Simply put, everyone else is likely to have their own interests and solutions and just like the fact that you chose the boat you own, they may have a completely different take.

    So, in the end, it does not matter. There is no right, or wrong, method and it's all up to the guy, or gal, who owns the boat. I'm sure that you agree with the individualism of personal ownership.
     
  12. ThomD
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    ThomD Senior Member

    I'd love to see some pictures of simple mounts. Never been able to figure out how to fit the outboard to my boat. My advise is to never buy plans from someone who does not give a really practical design. Often there is a 4 line square with recommended outboard HP in it, and the rest is left to one's imagination.
     
  13. Chris Ostlind

    Chris Ostlind Previous Member

    Should a designer also be required to provide plans that show how to make your own sails, or anchor, for example? That might sound sarcastic, but it's not meant in that fashion.

    One can suggest anything under the sun to a builder and then they go out and build it as they like, anyway.

    I do see your point, Thom. It's just that I'm kinda of the opinion that some stuff during the build and use of the boat is part of the responsibilty of the guy who is going to bang together his own vision.
     
  14. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    Phil Bolger once remarked that it was an old designer' gambit to leave the details that took too long to figure out to the builders experience. For the newbie builder those details are more of a priority. At least in the internet age it is easier to find ideas for those that don't want to roll their own or reinvent the wheel. Finding a solution to your own unique equipment and situation though can and should be fun. The owner builder can have a tailored solution instead of buying off the rack. Now if the shoe fits.........:)
     

  15. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

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