Toys??

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by BHOFM, Jul 16, 2008.

  1. BHOFM
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    BHOFM Senior Member

    Can we talk about toys??

    Dumas Star45.

    Oak framed, cedar planked, carbonfiber skinned.
    Hollow wooden mast, canvas covered deck, handmade
    jam cleats, 21 turnbuckles, 10lbs ballast, lead bulb!

    45" long, 8' tall, 15lbs disp.!

    Goes like a bullet, turns in its own length!

    Built in 1990 and has gone far enough to circle the
    globe several times!
     

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  2. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    but what can you do with it?
     
  3. longliner45
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    longliner45 Senior Member

    nice piece of work,,,I wish I had one,longliner
     
  4. longliner45
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    longliner45 Senior Member

    if you had a print of a full size sailboat,,,could you build a small scale boat,,like that ?
     
  5. BHOFM
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    BHOFM Senior Member

    These things are full of electric winches, relays, and radios!

    You can sit in a lawn chair with a cooler (full) and enjoy
    hours of relaxing fun and $0 cost!

    The batterys last several days. They are as much for
    ballast as for power!

    These things draw kids, young and old boys and girls
    like flies to a redneck wedding!

    This is a 1/5 scale of Ken Hankinsons Ensenada 25!

    It is a plywood form covered with carbonfiber and
    a steel keel.

    60" long, 9' tall, just over 60 lbs! 22lbs ballast!

    The real boat was lost in a storm 12/24/88!

    The last two are the Star45 some details and a nice
    day to take pictures, no wind!
     

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  6. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    BHOFM, Your toys look neat and your lake seems just what is needed... I had a go in preparing for my big boat (images are still in the gallery - Just to keep me honest and realise I am not a builder type person... Others will be designing and building for me..... Good on you - -Keep at it (slightly cheaper than the full size stuff yet still competitive....)
     
  7. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    very pretty but referring back to my original question - WHAT can you do with it (that's useful)?
     
  8. BHOFM
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    BHOFM Senior Member


    All work and no play,, makes safewalrus a dull boy??

    Kidding,, OK??
     
  9. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    BHOFM, your reply will confuse the Walrus - work is a dirty word and no one is allowed to use such profanities??? I guess he thinks "work" is what is done to lift a glass/bottle containing an alcoholic beverage to his mouth...... :D:D:D
     
  10. BHOFM
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    BHOFM Senior Member

    Then the,, "Cooler (full)" should have made it clear?

    The "lake" is 77 miles long, 38,000 acres, 500 miles of
    shore line and is in three county's in NW Arkansas USA.
     

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  11. Trevlyns
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    Trevlyns Senior Citizen/Member

    Mike, you lose some weight and sail on the flipping thing :D
     
  12. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Trev you mean I have to put the bottle down?
     
  13. safewalrus
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    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    So you can't use it to escape in then BHOM (funny way to spelll 'bomb' by the way)
     

  14. George S
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    George S The old fellow

    RC sloops are fine BUT what about Rc ships, or at least a brig. Steel, Chapman and Hutchinson Ltd of Palo Alto CA sell tthree great vessels, a frigate, a sloop of war (brig) and a US privateer schooner with three square sails. BUT, they are big, heavy and expensive. The heavy and expensive affect me. So my question is Who is interested in designing, building and sailing a square rigged toy that is between 3 to 4 feet lwl aand weighs (ready to sail) under 30 Lbs.?
    I built my first square rigger maybe 15 years ago. At that time I thought quarter inch exterior grade plywood was the way to go. And I was younger and more foolish so I decided that I wanted the largest boat I could build with 4'x8' plywwod. The finished boat was about 7 1/2 feet long (lenght on deck) and weighed 40 pounds without ballast. It was hard chine, flat bottomed and I rigged it as a ship with about a dozen sails, red ripstop nylon. I then bought a goodly amount of lead pigs, got an old red wagon and loaded all of this into the back of our very nice toyota truch and dove down to the pond in central Washington DC. Dragging the boat and ballast from the truck to the pond destroyed the suspension on the wagon but I/ we (my wife was helping) got the boat into the water and went for a little sail. BUT the breeze faded to almost nothing so we retrieved the boat (after taking one or two photos) and reversed the whole process. My conclusion was the boat was TOO BIG and TOO Heavy.
    About ten years ago I participated in sailing SHC's brig. That was great with a 3 man team but the wind was just as uncooperative, So I tried a second time , but my team mates were busy so I tried it essentially alone, and down a steep bank to a pond an hour or so south of DC. Again too little wind and a very heavy, tiring haul of the boat on its carriage up the bank and back to the truck.
    So now I am trying to find out how many people are interested in buying (or building) a smaller square rigged boat. If we find enouh interested folks perhaps we can get a manufacturer interested in making the molds and offering the hull (etc.) for sail. So the $64 question is: WHO WOULD LIKE SUCH A BOAT AND WHAT SIZE HULL DO YOU WANT???
    Now SCH ballast their boats (at least the brig) with very heavy lead ballast, some internal (on the ship) and some external, bolted up tight to the true keel.
    My idea is to decrease the ballast weight but add an external fin so that the ballast is, maybe, a foot or so below the bottom of the hull. Thus we would get a lighter assembly with the same or better righting moment.
    So we get to the first question: what is the maximum draft that you can stand at your boating site? Likewise what load water line length do you want? What sparred length? What uprig time do you desire?
    Will you be satisfied with freesailing the boat or do you want radio control?
    What ready-to-sail weight do you want? 20, 30, 40, 50, 100, 120 pounds?
    So those are some of the questions we need answers to if we are going tto try and interest a model builder/seller.
    Thanks
    George S.
     
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