Tiller Replacement

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Jnye, Dec 12, 2020.

  1. Jnye
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Long Island Sound

    Jnye Junior Member

    Got small winter project I'm hoping to get some help spec'ing out. My current tiller is ugly and heavy. It's essentially a square aluminum tube with flared stainless flanges bolted to the tiller and rudder cap. I'd like to replace the aluminum tube with a foam/carbon composite. Thinking a braided db sleeve for the laminate.

    Assuming 8oz carbon, any suggestions on the number of layers? Any value in considering some uni along with the biax? And 5lb foam okay? G10 tubes for through bolting the extension tiller, receptacle for the pin on the pilot arm and the bolts attaching the tiller to the straps?

    Boat is an Olson 30 which is relatively light. 3,800lbs displacement. Small-ish rudder so the boat will likely spin out before the loads become huge. Not that I want to skimp here.

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  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 10,178
    Likes: 966, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Really ? A carbon fibre tiller ? Sounds like a gold-plating exercise, when you say it is too heavy, perhaps the solution is to be able to fix it into position, or have a counterbalance weight.
     
  3. Jnye
    Joined: Mar 2018
    Posts: 8
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Long Island Sound

    Jnye Junior Member

    Mr. E... Thank you for your reply. Yes, I suppose it could be glass but it's a short run and unlikely to break the bank either way so why not carbon? Seems this would be a good application. And the current tiller is "heavy" in the absolute sense. I'm not interested in arguing if the weight savings is worth it. This is a race boat and pounds matter, particularly in the ends. And the current arrangement is an affront aesthetically.

    So, anyone with a suggested lamination schedule using 8oz carbon and/or glass and the right density foam to use?

    Thanks,
    Jonathan
     

  4. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
    Posts: 10,178
    Likes: 966, Points: 113, Legacy Rep: 702
    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    No worries. It just looks like making work (and outlay) for yourself, but it is of course your boat, your time, and your money !
     
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