temporary repair in the water

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by urisvan, Sep 22, 2017.

  1. urisvan
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Posts: 220
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: istanbul

    urisvan Senior Member

    i have an old wooden boat and sailing around the world. few days ago i discovered a rotten part. it is where the keel meets with planking. i cleaned as much as possible the soft wood and it became a big scar which is 30cm lenght, 5cm width and 3 cm depth. i need to repair this from inside.
    still little bit water is coming. i dont know if the water coming from the sea or from the wood itself. i prepared a wood which fits more or less the shape of the place but i can not glue it with epoxy because the wood is wet.
    i need a repair that can safely stay for two months then i will be on land.
    helps really appreciated

    Regards
    Ulas
     
  2. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 722
    Likes: 126, Points: 43
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member


    There are urethane based glues that actually need water to cure.

    Some epoxy formulations also will bond under water. I don't ghar o out further than I am willing to swim back without some onboard.

    I have used bubble gum, parafin, roofing tar and cans of expansion foam as emergency stop leaks.
     
  3. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,707
    Likes: 416, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Sheet metal on the outside with roofing tar works well.
     
  4. urisvan
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Posts: 220
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: istanbul

    urisvan Senior Member

    i will do sth from inside. i am thinking to use cement.
     
  5. urisvan
    Joined: Nov 2005
    Posts: 220
    Likes: 5, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 53
    Location: istanbul

    urisvan Senior Member

    does roofing tar bonds with wet surface?
     
  6. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,707
    Likes: 416, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

  7. Blueknarr
    Joined: Aug 2017
    Posts: 722
    Likes: 126, Points: 43
    Location: Colorado

    Blueknarr Senior Member


    Cement doesn't bond to wood.

    Remember, temporary repairs need to be undone before permanent repair.
    Frozen tar is easier to remove than warm tar.

    Water pressure will often hold outside repairs in place, covering could prevent water flow from dislodging.
    To do repair from inside, one must overcome the water pressure forcing sealer away from surface.
     
  8. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 3,324
    Likes: 145, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1819
    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    A couple of years ago a local fisherman asked me for a handful of long nails, said he needed them for a quick repair. He also wanted to borrow a trailer for a couple of days, no further explanation.
    It turned out to be a kind of emergency. His boat had hit a rock and was sinking rapidly.... He took a garbage bag and some plywood, nailed that to the hull from the outside, spent the rest of the afternoon pumping the water out and came back for the trailer.
    Later he hammered the nails back from the inside, removed the patch and made a more permanent repair with a wedged piece of timber and some epoxy putty. The many nail holes he stuffed with matches or toothpicks. Job done!
     
  9. Lepke
    Joined: Sep 2015
    Posts: 81
    Likes: 6, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Oregon to Alaska

    Lepke Junior Member

    There is a product called Stay Afloat. It will patch and hold low pressure water leaks, including blocking an open thru hull. http://www.stayafloatmarine.com/ There are videos on their site. Available in many marine stores, Amazon, and Ebay. stay-afloat.png
     
  10. pauloman
    Joined: Jun 2010
    Posts: 267
    Likes: 10, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 151
    Location: New Hampshire

    pauloman Epoxy Vendor

    in the book "escape from Hermit Island" underwater epoxy was used to repair a sunken boat that hit a coral head. It was then refloated and sailed 400 miles to a major port for 2 years of repairs. You can find that book or amazon -or maybe just google it or google underwater epoxy. I provided the two women with the apply underwater epoxies used to save their sunken boat. More commonly these sorts of underwater epoxies are used (with fiberglass cloth) to repair leaking barges that have been turned into floating homes. These barges were sold to the homeowner because they were starting to corrode away. You cannot haul out a barge with a 2 or 3 story home on top! Don't sail off into the sunset without underwater epoxy for emergency repairs!
     

  11. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 5,839
    Likes: 277, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1749
    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    I will add my vote to the "paintable tar" solution. Get the stuff that can be painted on, and is used to waterproof water tanks etc, even if painted in water itself.
    You need the solution that wont actually dry out altogether. It will probably last the rest of you journey. Make sure that you have the mechanical fastenings in place, because although it has good adherence, its strength is not like epoxy.


    Another popular brand
    Water Based Bitumen Paint: Waterproofing: Crommelin http://www.crommelin.com.au/range/at-home/waterproofing-products/water-based-bitumen-paint/
     
Loading...
Similar Threads
  1. Ghentleman
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    121
  2. pat1957
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    209
  3. buzzy bee
    Replies:
    11
    Views:
    1,288
  4. andyf2310
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    2,449
  5. Lynton
    Replies:
    15
    Views:
    2,744
  6. OrcaSea
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    2,557
  7. OrcaSea
    Replies:
    16
    Views:
    3,543
  8. grjack
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    1,276
  9. Triocd
    Replies:
    8
    Views:
    3,365
  10. Ultimate Design
    Replies:
    21
    Views:
    10,610
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.