Surf launching and retrieval, needs some updating

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by EStaggs, Aug 28, 2014.

  1. EStaggs
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 108
    Likes: 6, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 114
    Location: Spokane, Wa

    EStaggs Senior Member

    I've had this idea burbling around in my head for about a year that the Pacific City dory needs an update, and there's only a few people who want to tackle this issue because it's a limited number of boats in a relatively small span of coastline in the Pacific Northwest.

    Here's the current front line boat:

    [​IMG]

    Hard chines, plywood construction, built quickly. Oiled interior, and chopper gun glass on the exterior. Here's a couple photos for those not familiar with the type/fishery.

    Running out through the surf:

    [​IMG]

    Returning through the surf:

    [​IMG]

    Surf is generally between flat and 6' (2m), because over that it's too rough to fish.

    They ride terribly due to their full bow and flat bottom. However they need to be able to float on mist because of the beach launching. Payload includes 3 humans and anywhere between 6 salmon and 25 tuna.

    My questions:

    If the hard chine were replaced, in favor of a round chine with a tight turn, would this ease the ride and minimize chine tripping running in on a following sea, or is it a minimal difference? Assumptions here being a decent captain and a radius of 6" min and 12" max.

    Second, would introducing an additional panel to the shape (going from 3 panel to 5 panel) and moving to a deadrise rather than just flare in the topsides, be a benefit in both the ride and the behavior in a following sea?

    I have very limited experience with round chine boats, so this is a bit of a quandary on my side. Running into the back of a 4'-6' wave with the bow of the boat at 25mph is obviously atypical behavior in a boat, but that's how this fishery operates.

    Thanks in advance.

    E

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MypitRPpEhE

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohXLgytcFtw
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    You have a major headache on your hands trying to introduce a "round chine" (is that a contradiction in terms ?) into that boat. A chamfer (bevel) would be a lot easier. It might be more productive to introduce some more lateral plane aft to counter the broaching tendency. Seems to me the attraction of that hull is it is dead easy to build, it is all downhill after that ! Getting bashed around in flat-bottomed boats is a young man's game, and no matter what you do, I don't see any realistic improvement in that department.
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I have seen boats somewhat like that, that had a simple vee bottom from stem to stern, maybe 12- 15 degrees , you get no forefoot to speak of, and it doesn't transition smoothly into the topsides at the stem, but tracking and ride has to be better, though still more suited to the hairy-chested. Simple enough to build.
     
  4. EStaggs
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 108
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    Location: Spokane, Wa

    EStaggs Senior Member

    She has to remain flat bottomed to slide up the beach and be loaded on the trailers, as well as being able to float shallow enough to be handled in the surf amongst the smallest waves.

    Radius chine might be a better term, but soft chined regardless.

    Was hoping people might have some perspective on boats that are exceptional in following seas, one of the worst situations these boats deal with.

    E
     
  5. Poida
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Location: Australia

    Poida Senior Member

    Cheeez Estaggs what part of Boat Ramp don't you guys under stand?

    Launching one of those boats would be a weeks work for me.

    Would an extendable draw bar help and guide posts built on to the trailer so you drive a vee hull onto it without beaching it?

    Poida
     

  6. EStaggs
    Joined: Aug 2007
    Posts: 108
    Likes: 6, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 114
    Location: Spokane, Wa

    EStaggs Senior Member

    Where this beach is, there's no boat launches for many miles north and south. Literally an hour's drive either direction to a suitable proper boat launch. It is also a historically and culturally important launch to Oregon and the salmon fisheries.

    Even with a 100' tongue on the trailer, the sand is too soft to move that weight, and the beach becomes rocky at a certain depth with sandstone reefs below.

    Surely there's at least some opinions on flat bottom boats around here.

    E
     
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