Suggestions for removing old contact cement from wood?

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by magentawave, Nov 14, 2019.

  1. magentawave
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    magentawave Senior Member

    I want to remove this butt ugly vinyl / naugahyde on several surfaces of the interior of my boat that was applied with contact cement. The challenge is to remove the old contact cement. After that I'll paint the surface.

    I'm open to recommendations and tips, but what do you think about removing the contact cement with Goo Gone Pro Power Gel? https://tinyurl.com/yxxxbwwa
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Acetone ? Might remove more than the offending material though.
     
  3. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It is not impossible, but really hard. Solvents will get some of the cement, but will drive the rest further into the wood grain. A grinder with 36 grit will do the trick but leave a very rough surface. The best solution is to glue a new laminate on top.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Maybe soften first with acetone, then use a shave hook, provide good ventilation !
     
  5. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    I'd scrape it with a chisel and see how long it takes to do say 2 square inches and extrapolate to see the hours.

    Then sand; might use a lot of 80 grit..
     
  6. magentawave
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    magentawave Senior Member

    I don't have room in some areas to get in there with 36 grit. The "laminate" before wasn't plastic laminate. It was butt ugly vinyl, as in naugahyde. I'm going to paint it after with white.


    I don't want to work with stanky acetone inside and it flash's too quickly to be of much use on a vertical surface anyway.


    That sounds like hell. I think I'll try the Goo Gone gel instead, but thanks!
     
  7. Blueknarr
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Try being very careful with a cabinet scraper.
     
  8. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You can glue white laminate on, which would be a lot less work.
     
  9. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    You will probably find a combination of methods best.

    For a large area; I would solve the paper or lay plastic over the area so the solvents don't flash and leave it on for awhile.

     
  10. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I have never seen solvent based paint hold well over old contact cement. It may be possible to get acceptable adhesion with a water based primer like Kilz for graffiti, but the finished surface is likely to be quite rough.
     
  11. BlueBell
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    BlueBell "Whatever..."

    Paint what's there white.
     
  12. Blueknarr
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    Blueknarr Senior Member

    Magenta wave

    It is old enough that the glue should be fully crystallized. But if there is still some gummyness, frequent and liberal sprinkling with an inert powder will be a god send ( talc, flour, saw dust )

    This is am excellent opportunity to learn and master reciprocal scrapers. Skills that will be most useful on your other project of repairing the damaged varnish. Don't bother with the cheap ones, they won't stay sharp. Start with a 2 inch carbide blade for the grunt work. A 6 inch cabinet scraper to smooth and flatten. A 3/4 by 1 1/2 tear drop will get into most concave surfaces.
     
  13. wet feet
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    wet feet Senior Member

    The only solvent I have ever known to work for removing contact adhesive was toluene.It is much more unpleasant in every way than acetone,but if you are really desperate to remove the residue and can arrange very high grade protection it might move the project forward.
     
  14. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
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    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Orange Citristrip will dissolve this. Then scrape if off with a carbide scraper. This stripper does not have obnoxious fumes.
     

  15. BlueBell
    Joined: May 2017
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    BlueBell "Whatever..."

    If you don't want to paint it as is, then fill it, fair it, and paint it.
    Or scrape it all off.
    It's that simple.
    There's no magic bullet.
     
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