submersible aircraft

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by rasorinc, Nov 5, 2008.

  1. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Would it be of interest to anyone to start a new thread on this subject?
    After kind of laughing at the idea I set down some parameters and worked through a few quick problems and I believe it is possible using a maximum
    depth of 80 meters or 9 bars of pressure. Stan
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2008
  2. Gilbert
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    Gilbert Senior Member

    I hear the aliens already have this technology.
     
  3. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect

    USO's, they have been on the history channel.

    I'm no engineer, but admire the efforts of others even if it's just a mental exercise.

    The efforts of this guy (Doug) and the process (shows his math) is impressive and might be a good reference point for this thread.

    SEEKER - by Doug
    http://www.submarineboat.com/submarine.htm

    These projects are cool too:
    http://www.navytimes.com/news/2007/02/apsubmarinedesigner070211/

    http://www.hyper-sub.com/product.hs600m.php

    Also, almost anything can be made to fly, or at least hover.
    http://www.minimarcos.org.uk/altpics/hovermini/index.html
     
  4. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    They already have one, it was used on the "Seaview" TV show of the 1960s where they used the flying sub to patrol the area around the sub's location.

    When in engineering school 25 years ago I did some calculation to see if this was possible. It might be if you had an efficient engine that did not need air to breath, and you had a "wet" sub. No way to make a dry sub work, way too heavy.

    But even as a wet sub, it likely would not fly well, or make a very good sub. And it would have very limited range. It would be more piratical to have a fold-up ultra-lite aircraft on a minim sub.
     
  5. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Well It will work. It looks like a round bodied PBY though. Stan
     
  6. big-boss
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    big-boss Junior Member

    I have thought about this as well, Civil Engineeer not a Naval like you guys. But give this some thought:
    Start with a flying boat then make it submersible. Should be easy enough to make a boat fly then fill it with water, right?
     
  7. FranklinRatliff

    FranklinRatliff Previous Member

    Darpa

    DARPA is serious about researching this concept as a means for delivering and recovering special ops personnel (seals).
     
  8. tspeer
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    tspeer Senior Member

    It's been done.

    Here are some design factors to think about.

    The issue of wet vs dry is of fundamental importance. Any buoyant volume is a hinderance when submerged, so dry space (if any) has to be kept to the bare minimum.

    Fuel is less dense than water, so fuel volume contributes to buoyancy. And it contributes to weight when flying, so fuel quantity hurts you coming and going.

    The implication of the two factors above mean it's the structural weight that has to be capable of overcoming the buoyancy of the fuel & payload. Then you have to carry that structural weight when you fly.

    The alternative to negative buoyancy is to fly underwater with positive buoyancy. There's a drag associated with that, of course. But at least they already have a flying configuration. Underwater gliders have been used for exploration and unmanned oceanographic vehicles. A good example is the UW Seaglider.
    [​IMG]
     
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  9. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect

    Now we are getting somewhere.

    Good post.
     
  10. FranklinRatliff

    FranklinRatliff Previous Member

    Shapes

    I first saw that shape (minus the wings) back in the late sixties. There was an article in Science News about research being done by the navy on low drag shapes using both small buoyant bodies released from the bottom and streamlined projectiles dropped from the surface.
     
  11. kach22i
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    kach22i Architect

  12. markdrela
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    markdrela Senior Member

    I've never figured out what advantage is obtained by "gliding" underwater. In the absence of vertical currents, the minimum energy needed to travel is Drag*Distance, and it doesn't matter whether the energy is used to run a small prop, or to pump out water at the sea bottom to regain positive bouyancy for the return glide back to the surface. But when gliding, you're dragging the wing through the water in addition to the body/payload. It seems that removing the wings/pump, setting up for near-neutral buoyancy at all times, and installing an optimized propeller will give better mileage.
     
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  13. Retired Geek
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    Retired Geek Junior Member

    Flight Internationals Concept

    this was posted on their website today (flightglobal.com)
     

    Attached Files:

  14. rickthorn
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    rickthorn Junior Member

    Competition for Navy Contract

    Within the past 2 weeks, I have heard the U.S. Navy is looking for a "flying submarine" of sorts for clandestine missions. Also, just thought the following is extremely cool...just needs a bit longer wings, more sleek design and more horsepower.

    http://www.hovercraft.com/content/media/video/19xrw_04_256k_lo.wmv
     

  15. Gannet
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    Gannet Junior Member

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