Strip Plank Construction problem

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Mat-C, Jun 8, 2011.

  1. Mat-C
    Joined: May 2007
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    Mat-C Senior Member

    I'm thinking of building a little boat of about 20 ft. The idea is all in my head at this stage, so sorry, I can't show any drawings or pics yet... But essntially it'll be a bit like a slipper craft - low, narrow and quite light - but with rather more curvature to the shape.
    Construction would be strip plank - FRP sheathed inside and out, with just a few bulkheads / ring frames made of ply for framing. The topsides would sweep over into the deck which would be strip planked too.
    Here's the rub... The only way I can imagine building this would be to build over the permanent frames, maybe with some intermediate temporary ones too. But how would you go about - 1. getting inside to clean up the eopxy as you glue the strips together. - and 2. how can you run the sheathing all the way inside if you've built over permanent frames?
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    There is a gap between the sheer and the floor. When you start it is all open, but later it will be smaller. At some point you'll have to crawl in and out.
    The sheathing gets laid between the frames. There will be tabbing to connect the frame or bulkhead to the sheathing.
     
  3. Mat-C
    Joined: May 2007
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    Mat-C Senior Member

    Thanks Gonzo
    I was just going to use the "rules" from Gerr's Elements of Boat Strength for the scantlings. In the section that covers strip planking with 'heavy sheathing' inside and out, he says that the inside sheathing should be continuous with the bulkheads / ring frames then tabbed to the glass. This makes sense to me as the hull shell is effectively an epoxy / FRP composite with a wood core. Any 'break' in the internal sheathing would surely become a weak point?
    The shape I have in mind will be very slender... I'm just not sure how feasible it will be to crawl inside....
    I was wondering about building it in two halves - either port / stbd or top / bottom and then taping it together... but then I'd still have the problem of getting access to tab the bulkheads in place....
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    It is easier to laminate the inside with no bulkheads. However, a good bond between the interior laminate and the bulkhead can be worked. Is there a reason you can't take out all the stations, laminate and then attach the bulkheads or ring frames.
     
  5. Mat-C
    Joined: May 2007
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    Mat-C Senior Member

    The strip planking would go from bottom to topsides to deck in one "continuous" curve... so I don't see how I could physically get the bulkheads / frames in there after it is all built....
    A pic tells a thousand words... I wish I had one! The closest I can think of is a cross between a much smaller small version of the VSV, Mary Slim ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6MFX3ldg9mQ# ) and Willallison's Sliver ( http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/proboat-design-comp-2-results-34622-2.html ) post #19
     
  6. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder


  7. Mat-C
    Joined: May 2007
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    Mat-C Senior Member

    Thanks PAR... I guess which way (top/bottom or port / stbd) would depend on the design...
    Then I guess I would just have to make it so that it is possible to get up inside to tab the frames / bulkheads in...

    Thanks again guys...:)
     
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