Starting problem

Discussion in 'Diesel Engines' started by davem99, Feb 17, 2011.

  1. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Glowplugs are threaded into the head. To modify a head to accept them is a major job. It would involve machining and welding cast iron. It is much easier to use an air and fuel heater.
     
  2. davem99
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Hamilton, Canada

    davem99 Junior Member

    Hi Gonzo, Thanks for your message about a glowplug - I suspected it would be a problem. My engine (Bukh DV8SME) has no provision for a glowplug or, as far as I can tell, for a block heater. It does have a "Cooling water drain plug" although I don't yet know what size it is. I'm wondering whether some sort of heating element might fit in this plug. Could you tell me, please, what is meant by an "air a fuel heater"? Any other comments will be highly apprecieted. Regards, DM.
     
  3. pistnbroke
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Noosa.Australia where god kissed the earth.

    pistnbroke I try

    note gonzo that some engines had provision for glow plugs in the design of the casting but these were never drilled and tapped in production the makers going for thermostart or either injection ....if this were the case in this engine then it could be done easily as a retro fit
     
  4. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    If it was a factory option it would be feasible. The block heaters are usually installed by removing a freeze plug.
     
  5. pistnbroke
    Joined: Jan 2009
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    Location: Noosa.Australia where god kissed the earth.

    pistnbroke I try

    Welch plug you mean...the hole where the sand was removed from the casting...heaters also fitted in bottom hose.....drain cut fit ..worm drive clip.
     
  6. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    No, they are called freeze plugs on this side of the world. They are large thin metal plugs.
     
  7. Carteret
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    Carteret Senior Member

  8. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    A block heater or water heater needs shore power.
    There are diesel powered heaters like the one in my Kia Sorento. It is used to help the engine quickly reach operating temperature and works completely automatically. A pretty expensive gadget!

    There are also glow plug/injector assemblies, to be installed in the intake plenum of a diesel engine. Iveco is one of the companies using this system instead of the more common glow plugs in the cylinder head.
     
  9. Submarine Tom

    Submarine Tom Previous Member

    Canadian terminology, as I know it, has "frost plugs" as 2 inch (52mm), thin, metal plugs (disks) friction-fit into cast holes in the block allowing for ice escapement in the event of inadvertent freezing due to insufficient antifreeze in the fresh water cooling system, thereby avoiding a cracked block. They may be flipped out by pressing in one side, rotating/pivoting, and prying out with a screw driver. 400 watt heating elements are available to replace the plug. On a small 4-cylinder, I've seen eight such plugs and replaced two (in opposite corners) with such heaters. They are shore powered.

    In-line, propane water heaters are also available when shore power is not.

    Glow plugs: fortunately in Canada, I've never seen (or imagined) a diesel without them...

    Ether, of course, works brilliantly but, as mentioned, use sparingly.

    Good luck.

    -Tom
     
  10. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    I have only seen it in the WW II parts catalog , but DD had a great system for their 71 series engines.

    An air box cover would be removed and replaced with a small cast unit.

    It has a spark igniter and with the push of a button would spray diesel into the chamber , as the engine was cranked.

    Anyone know where I could find this setup?

    FF
     
  11. Katoh
    Joined: May 2010
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    Location: A.C.T

    Katoh Senior Member

    I run my diesel's on 100% bio and have a little trick I use. Just before the fuel enters the pump I have a machined block of aluminium were the fuel runs through and it passes over a 14v glow plug. Because the plug is submerged in fuel and is oxygen deprived there's no chance of fire and the plug lasts a long time. This is controlled by thermostat.
    Now I dont know if it will help but injecting warm fuel is bound to do something and this way you dont have to touch your motor at all.
    Actually I think Racor do a filter with a heater in heat, it will do the same job. Do a search for Bio pre-heating, cold-starting, should help.
    http://www.maesco.com/products/racor/r_dfh_intro/r_dfh_intro.html
    There was also available a plug that tapped in to inlet manifold to heat the air up, was used on the the old grey mares (Ferguson tractors), you could get these through Lucas. I will ask a mate of mine tomorrow and get back to you.
    Good Luck

    Katoh
     
  12. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    There are magnetic heaters that can be slipped under the oil sump, or put on the block it self that are about 300W ,not much but $20, and it might be enough.
     
  13. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    Why are you re designing the engine when you need to find the fault. Im sure these engines are not manufactured with bad starting,--- and its a core plug.

    Did he not say its starting has got worse, so-- thats a poor starter motor or a battery for a start off,--pun intended.
     
  14. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    bukh engines are designed to start with no aids, a friend has one which used to start easy and as it has aged it has turned into a pig to start. he was told to rebuild it or shave the head . apparently if they have a slight drop in compression they don't start well. i guess the compression must be border line from new.
     

  15. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    a perkins flamer does that.
     
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