starting a wood and glass boathave a ???

Discussion in 'Materials' started by timbecht, Apr 9, 2012.

  1. timbecht
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 19
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: indiana

    timbecht Junior Member

    i am going to be building a 14foot by 4foot flat jon boat and setting it up to bass boat style i will be glassing the entire outside of it and will be using polyresin what types of paint to use on the outside i have heard bout some sherwin williams but need more info on this please
     
  2. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Posts: 2,612
    Likes: 372, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 506
    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    Paint is the least of your concerns at this point.

    Epoxy will be a much better choice for this type of application.
     
  3. timbecht
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 19
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: indiana

    timbecht Junior Member

    yeah why do u say that it still has to be painted for uv protected
     
  4. timbecht
    Joined: May 2011
    Posts: 19
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: indiana

    timbecht Junior Member

    so what type or brand paint
     
  5. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Posts: 2,612
    Likes: 372, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 506
    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    There are many paints that will work well, from very low cost to very high $$$, you sort of get what you pay for. They will have little long term affect on how well your boat performs or holds up though.

    Your choice of plans, wood, resin, glass, plus your skills will be the key factors for long term survival of the hull, and should be your first concerns.
     
  6. Harry Josey
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 26
    Likes: 1, Points: 0
    Location: South Africa

    Harry Josey Junior Member

    If you are going with polyester I suggest you use mat rather than cloth,which has poor peel strength with polyester and wood. Mat will stick better and be more waterproof. As for paint, a lot of builders have had great success with good quality acrylic house paint. Take a look at
    www.simplicityboats.com/methodsmaterials.html

    Good luck with your build.

    Harry
     
  7. Harry Josey
    Joined: Jan 2012
    Posts: 26
    Likes: 1, Points: 0
    Location: South Africa

    Harry Josey Junior Member

    Sorry that link doesn't seem to work, try
    www.simplicityboats.com scan down to alternative methods and materials

    Harry
     
  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 480, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Tim, making polyester resin stick to wood can be quite difficult. It can be made to work, but you'll need quite a bit of resin to produce an effective sheathing, that will stay attached years down the road.

    One of the keys is to soak the wood with a well thinned resin mix first, then start the mat laminate. This will help "key" the resin into the surface and the mat will have a reasonable grip. If you just try to "paint" the mat in place with resin (what most try to do) then it'll peel off pretty easily.

    This is the reason (plus others) that most here will recommend epoxy over polyester resin. You see, polyester resin isn't waterproof enough to prevent wood from expanding and contracting with moisture content. This expansion thing will eventually cause the wood to shear away from the hard plastic polyester coating/sheathing. Epoxy is water proof, so it doesn't have this problem.

    As to paint, you get what you pay for (as previously mentioned). I'm using a multiple part paint system that costs about $400 a gallon. It's bullet proof, has extremely high gloss and is very durable. At the other end of the scale are the house paints from Ace Hardware. They're about $25 a gallon, easy to apply and come in hundreds of pretty colors. They are also not very hard, nor especially durable and most will let moisture right through, testing whatever you have under it pretty quickly.
     

  9. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Posts: 2,612
    Likes: 372, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 506
    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member



    Par, it's hard to believe you said that.

    Thinning polyester has similar results as thinning epoxy, the physical properties drop, and depending on the amount of thinner, they may drop drastically. If someone wants to use a thin resin to pre coat the wood, use a infusion resin, it needs no thinning. What you fight when thinning laminating resin is the silica added to make it work well in hand lamination (no sagging or draining). The silica can inhibit the flow into the wood.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.