Starter button,without ignition switch?

Discussion in 'Outboards' started by valvebounce, Mar 7, 2017.

  1. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    I have an 18hp Evinrude set up on remotes,it's a pull start.
    I am contemplating getting a 30hp Evinrude (2 stroke)
    I would prefer to have a button or switch for the starter motor without using a key ignition switch.Is this possible?
    My present setup works fine, but I would just like to have an electric start.
    I am told I would need the red plug in loom to use a key start,would I still need the loom if
    I just have a starter button and no key switch?
    Could the 12v battery just serve the starter?
    Any help will be gratefully received.
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    You will need to have a separate kill switch, which grounds the ignition. This is assuming it is not an electronically controlled engine. The usual switch defaults to a grounded ignition when in the Off position.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The standard ignition switch provides two or three hot terminals and one momentarily hot terminal, besides the off position. The idea is to have an accessory position, for ignition off situations, an ignition on terminal, for non-starting applications and an everything off except the start circuit position, so all of the battery energy can go to starting the engine.

    If you separate out the circuits, you'll need at least one SPST switch for the ignition one circuit and a momentary switch for the start circuit, plus a kill SPST switch that grounds the ignition for shutting down. As Gonzo mentioned, this only works on a conventional ignition system. Electronic setups can also be done like this, though you probably don't need the kill switch, because turning off the ignition one circuit will do the same thing.

    The engine umbilical wiring diagram should make the various circuits pretty clear. Just a momentary switch means you'll need to have a continuously hot ignition circuit, which isn't a good idea. Which year and model engine is this?
     
  4. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    Thanks for your reply Gonzo.The engine looks like a mid 90's model PAR,It's up for sale on ebay.
    It's from an outboard dealer,he says it has good compressions,but will need a service,as it was a trade in.
    He can supply a red plug loom.
    I haven't made any enquiries about the year or model.
    I can handle the servicing,but ignition electrics are not my strong point.
    It looks like if I upgrade,I will need an electrician.
    Thanks for the info.
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Nah, it's pretty simple electrical stuff really. Just grab a manual for the remote wiring harness and you'll figure it out.
     
  6. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Adriatic sea

    CDK retired engineer

    The question is why should you deviate from the usual setup?
    An ignition key limits the number of people that are able to start your engine to those who have the key. Very useful if there are kids on board.

    But if you are a guy who often forgets his keys, use a double pole rocker switch with the function (1)-0-1, where (1) means spring loaded. If the engine has electronic ignition you also need a small latching relay to turn on the ignition during starting.
     
  7. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    Glad you have confidence in me,Haha.I suppose a look in a manual is a good idea.
     
  8. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    I was out on a pals boat and his ignition switch failed,luckily we were on and incoming tide
    and not too far out and paddled in to the beach slipway.
    It left me with a bit of a fear of ignition switches.On a car I would have jumped the ignition switch.
    The boat is only 14ft,and will only have adults on it.(inshore fishing)My idea was to keep it simple and not need a key.
    I keep the boat on my drive,and trailer it every time out,so I am with it at all times.
    I would take the battery off after each trip for security.(and charging)
     
  9. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You can "jump" a boat ignition switch, just as easily as an automotive unit. In fact, other than bronze internal contacts and a few other marine features for moisture, they're basically the same as standard ignition automotive pieces.
     
  10. valvebounce
    Joined: Dec 2010
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    That's handy to know,like you said earlier,I need to have a look at a manual
     
  11. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

    Pretty much any carby outboard you can unplug the loom and pull start it.
     
  12. valvebounce
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    valvebounce Senior Member

    I'm 72 on Sunday,and teetering about a bit,Haha.The electric start would save me setting the lever and going to the back of the boat to pull start it.
    I lived in Cheltenham in Melbourne in the early 60's,not far from Beumauris.Still rue the day I left.
     

  13. powerabout
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    powerabout Senior Member

    of course 2 screwdrivers and you can jump the solenoid
     
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