Split Fiberglass Ribs

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by Alaska242, Aug 27, 2020.

  1. Alaska242
    Joined: Aug 2020
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    Location: North

    Alaska242 New Member

    I am new to this site- and looking for some advise. I have acquired a 1984 Formula 242 Sportfish with the intention of removing the I/O and installing outboards on a bracket. After pulling the engine, I found many of the "ribs" in the engine bay are split- longitudinally along the rib. I believe this is the result of water being trapped inside the rib, freezing and spitting the rib. I don't see any deformation in the bottom of the boat or signs of impact. Q1- is this a reasonable conclusion, or are there other thoughts as to causation. My second question is more nebulous: Is the boat: a) wrecked; b) reasonably repairable; c) needs only a few layers of glass laid down to seal the cracks and drill bungs for drainage; or d) not worry about it (what's the worst that can happen). Thanks - Engine Bay 1.jpg Engine Bay 2.jpg Engine Bay 3.jpg Engine Bay 4.jpg Engine Bay 5.jpg Engine Bay.jpg
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Are they wood cored? It may simply be that the wood got wet, swelled and cracked the fiberglass. The only proper repair is to cut/ grind everything out and replace it. The boat is totally salvageable. It you rebuild it as original, with wood core, polyester and mat, the cost of material will be less than $600
     
  3. Alaska242
    Joined: Aug 2020
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    Location: North

    Alaska242 New Member

    They are wood cored- I jumped to the conclusion they were not cored because there is a drain tube over the keel that looks very similar. I drilled a couple of the ribs and the wood is dry and solid. Now I am thinking delamination exacerbated by the freeze thaw cycle we have in spring and fall. Perhaps just ctting back the delaminated sections and re-glassing.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    By all means drill a few exploratory holes, to establish the extent of rot, refill later of course, but it does look very repairable, if all is well as regards rot, you could grind down the cracked areas and re-glass easily enough. I'm not au fait with damage from freezing, it never gets that cold over here ! That's a good hull and well worth the work.
     

  5. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The wood is delaminated from the sides and bottom. You can cut the top of the fiberglass and remove the wood. Grind the sides to get good adhesion on the new laminate. The new wood needs to be bedded with either commercial polyester putty (not bondo) or you can mix your own. By leaving the vertical sides, it is easier to place the reinforcements.
     
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