Soft Rigging Solutions

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by HydroNick, Aug 17, 2013.

  1. village idiot
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    village idiot Junior Member

    Front
     

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  2. catsketcher
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    catsketcher Senior Member

    Nice tri. What is she?
     
  3. village idiot
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    village idiot Junior Member

    Newick tremalino
     
  4. HydroNick
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    HydroNick Nick S

  5. HydroNick
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    HydroNick Nick S

  6. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member


    Hi Jeff,
    I was not able to find those photos and enlarge them as you suggested.
     
  7. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    proper name for these 'mast connection'?

    What name might be proper for these 'blocks' that would attach to the mast tube to keep a 'loop' of rigging rope/wire from sliding down the mast ??

    cheek blocks?.....

     
  8. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    ..a couple of other photos I ran across of something similar to what I am speaking of...
     

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  9. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

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  10. DGreenwood
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    DGreenwood Senior Member

    Brian
    They have more than one name that I've heard but we always referred to them as a "thumb". A cheek, a bolster and of course the general term for the landing of a "soft eye" is "the hounds".
     
  11. HydroNick
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    HydroNick Nick S

  12. BobBill
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    BobBill Senior Member

    Decent stuff. I am using Samson Amsteel with 7x19 wire and Clamcleats, so basically, Amsteel is the link in the chain, watching how it does...will provide pics when the rain stops...hope the thread goes on forever...love experimenting.
     
  13. Stumble
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    Stumble Senior Member

    Generally amsteel is considered far too stretchy for standing rigging. It will work but the size required to control stretch is rediculious. The prefered option is a heat set variety of dyneema like D12 MAX 99.
     
  14. BobBill
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    BobBill Senior Member

    Now that is interesting, as I thought Amsteel was Dyneema...D12? Have to check that one. It is new to me!

    I also have some really small diameter Technora...strong but very stiff. I bought some 7/32 Amsteel to support a tramp, but have not installed. I get my fat *** on it, will know how stretchy it is...
     

  15. Stumble
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    Stumble Senior Member

    Dyneema comes in different grades. The sk-75 (amsteel) is the lowest end stuff currently on the market, and at the top of the market is SK-99. The major difference is the higher the number the stronger the line.

    But there is also a heat setting process (HSR) that is applied to the base dyneema. So SK-75 becomes SK-78 HSR. The heat set process increases the strength of the fibers, reduces creep, and greatly reduces stretch, but makes the line much stiffer.

    For running rigging SK-75 is pretty much ubiquitous with the higher end stuff just being used in specialty applications and where price is absolutely no issue (it's insainly expensive), while SK-78 was the first one that really was used for standing rigging (Colligio et al). I don't have the numbers in front of me, but I think the HSR typically reduces stretch by about 75%, basically it puts it right in line with SS wire.
     
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