smallest kicker for a 20' whaler

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by Savannah, Feb 16, 2014.

  1. Savannah
    Joined: Feb 2014
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    Savannah Junior Member

    What's the smallest kicker outboard that would get a Boston whaler Dauntless 20 back home?
     
  2. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    I would go with a 9.9 if using in the ocean.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    A paddle is about as small as fuel efficient as you can get. A 2 HP kicker will get you home, though it's not going to be a fast ride. I'd recommend a 5 HP outboard with FNR, so it's a handy thing. A 9.9 is a lot more then you need, but does offer some punch. It all depends on what you want and where you usually need it. If you're in steep chop and contrary winds and current, you'll want the extra punch of a bigger engine, but if you're just looking for a backup, if the main engine takes a dump, any little outboard will do, abet slowly.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I'd say 9.9 would be the minimum offshore, even with the ideal propellor. Otherwise you could be doing 2 knots backwards if wind and tide are against you. I recently gave away a 9.9 to a relative to use as a back-up on a 16 footer, he reports it is about right for the job. I haven't seen any fish fillets, yet. :D
     
  5. Savannah
    Joined: Feb 2014
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    Savannah Junior Member

    Thanks for the time replying.

    I'm not in shape enough to paddle a center console and get anywhere. I'd probably die trying to paddle it.

    My main thing be for an emergency. I don't want to be the next guy who floats across the ocean for 13 months. I don't know the waters at all yet and want to explore all around the state. I'll trailer a boat for different outings and also want to pick some good days and go out into the ocean a little distance.

    A 9.9 sounds good.

    How far would a 9.9 push a 20' whaler on 5 gallons of gas?
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    That would vary with the particular engine and the sea and wind, but I'd work on about 20 miles or thereabouts. Paddles are that close to useless, it doesn't matter.
     
  7. tsharac
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    tsharac New Member

    I spent a better part of last winter installing a Yamaha T9.9 onto my 21' walkaround following the advice I found on a different website. Cost me around $5k for the engine, dual binnacle throttle controls, cables, outboard bracket, dual steering teleflex cable, etc. My thinking was it would be nice to use pints/hour at a slow troll, keep a charge on the batteries, and have a backup engine if the main gets fouled up.

    But if your intent is to use a spare 9.9 for an emergency only, I think relying on SeaTow/Towboat US plus a robust anchor with plenty of line would be quite a bit cheaper and less trouble than having a 90# 9.9 plus 5 gallons of old gas on board. What's the coverage of SeaTow/Towboat US like in your intended waters?

    About the range, check my performance numbers with the T9.9.
     
  8. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    I would go for a 15 minimum. you can bet that when you need it the currents and wind will be working against you. I had a 12 hp tohatsu sail boat auxillary on an 18 ft 1/2 cab and that was marginal. a 15 and a 9.9 are the same dimensions and weight anyway so why not.
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Fair commentary, I do think what is equally important is an engine with a greater gear reduction, and a propellor of biggest diameter, even with four blades if available. And of course the right pitch, toward the lower end of the selection choice.
     
  10. tsharac
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    tsharac New Member

    I agree. The Yamaha T9.9 comes standard with a 11 3/4" x 7" prop and a 2.92:1 gear ratio, producing a ton of low end thrust, similar to putting your boat into 4-wheel drive. The Yamaha F15 can only fit a 9 3/4" diameter prop and a 2.08:1 gear ratio, so you're spinning a smaller prop at a faster speed, that'll develop less thrust and more slip when trying to push 4,000 #s of boat.
     
  11. FishStretcher
    Joined: Oct 2011
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    FishStretcher Junior Member

    I use a Tohatsu SailPro 6 hp on my 20 foot center console. It was inexpensive. It isn't refined. I seem to recall 4 or 5 knots at WOT?

    Mine has a 25" or 30" shaft to keep it out of a following sea. I think 30" shafts are no longer available. It will also charge a battery.

    It works REALLY WELL in an estuary. I can tilt the main engine, and back out to the channel from the float in 18" of water at low tide.
     
  12. Reefhunter
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    Reefhunter Junior Member

    I use Tohatsu's on several of our boats. My experience with them is fantastic. We went thru several name brand o/b's before buying a Tohatsu 8. A world of difference. They are well built and don't require a lot of specialized maintenance. FYI - if you're also looking at Nissan motors, Tohatsu builds them too!
     
  13. Savannah
    Joined: Feb 2014
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    Savannah Junior Member

    I had a health setback in March and I only got back to the site now and I see there are many replies. I want to thank everybody for the links and replies. I will go over them all.
     
  14. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Welcome to the forum and Godspeed your recovery to health.


    Thanks to Tim for the rpm chart.
     

  15. Savannah
    Joined: Feb 2014
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    Savannah Junior Member

    Thank you, I surely appreciate my health more now; only have to finish paying the bills and take better care of myself now.

    Keeping the 5 gallon tank fresh is something I didn't think about much. I could put stabilizer in it or transfer it to the main tank every few months. Might need a hand pump to keep from spilling.
     
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