Single-handed Skiff

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by nacra5.8, Jun 17, 2012.

  1. nacra5.8
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 54
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: SF Bay

    nacra5.8 Junior Member

    Hi guys, I'm thinking of building a 14 or 15 foot singlehanded skiff with around 140 sq ft of sail area, wings, T-Foil rudder, carbon mast, a real high-performance boat. I was thinking of using foam/carbon/epoxy for the bottoms and wood/glass for the topsides and deck. I am fairly set on designing the boat myself- I want the personal satisfaction of seeing something that I've created (with help of course) from start to finish.

    Mainly what I would like input on is the hull shape. I have been reading all over the internet, and Bethwaite's High Performance Sailing, for months, but I'm still not sure if my hull is at all acceptable or if it would totally fail. I've attached the file for you guys to look over, and maybe comment on. Thanks!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. nacra5.8
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 54
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: SF Bay

    nacra5.8 Junior Member

    Also- target all-up weight is 180 pounds. Seeing the Falco/Quetzal at around 120 definitely leads me to believe that that would be possible
     
  3. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,651
    Likes: 322, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Sorry, cant open your file. Sounds like a great project-good luck!
     
  4. nacra5.8
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 54
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: SF Bay

    nacra5.8 Junior Member

    Sorry Doug, I'll try again.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,651
    Likes: 322, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    =====
    The Machine says : "windows does not recognize this file type"?? Oh, well...
     
  6. nacra5.8
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 54
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: SF Bay

    nacra5.8 Junior Member

    Darn. You do have DELFTship, right?
    I'll try saving as a dxf file, can you open those?
     
  7. nacra5.8
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 54
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: SF Bay

    nacra5.8 Junior Member

    Here it is
     

    Attached Files:

  8. frank smith
    Joined: Oct 2009
    Posts: 980
    Likes: 14, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 185
    Location: usa

    frank smith Senior Member

    How about just posting a screen shot ?
     
  9. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,651
    Likes: 322, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    =============
    Same thing.......
     
  10. thudpucker
    Joined: Jul 2007
    Posts: 885
    Likes: 31, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 453
    Location: Al.

    thudpucker Senior Member

    I'm not a Whiffer, but ...
    Looking at that drawing with the Sharpie Bow and nearly flat bottomed, it seems to me that steering that Ship through a choppy Sea would be a chore of you couldn't keep that 'Chin' up out of the water.
     
  11. gggGuest
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 828
    Likes: 24, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 76
    Location: UK

    gggGuest ...

    That seems like a funny mix, and a pain in the neck as well. I don't think I've ever come across a good racing dinghy built with wood topsides and foam below the chine, and there are lots of good reasons why not.
    Assuming you do your shell on a male mould its not going to cost you an awful lot more work to set up the topsides, and you'll get a much better integrated structure. Wood decks on the other hand are very feasible, but there's a bigger weight penalty than you might think, because you have to make arrangements to get a bit more width into the shell at deck level to support the ply and so on.

    180lbs all up ought to be pretty easily achieved, depending on how you do things in detail and how much bulk there is in the boat.

    None of my apps can successfully read your dxf file.
     
  12. nacra5.8
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 54
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: SF Bay

    nacra5.8 Junior Member

    Alright, I guess I'll go with carbon/foam/kevlar hull, and wood deck and wings (they're going to be solid). Actually, ideally I would want the boat to come in at around 150- we'll see. It's competing with the RS700 at my club, and I think if it weighs less and has more sail both up wind and down it should be able to beat it pretty consistently. Length-wise I'm not so sure now, basically the foam I'm getting comes in 80" increments, so after around 13 feet, I can go all of the way up to maybe 18 feet long. Currently, the boat is 15 feet long with a waterline beam of around 2 and a half feet- does that sound reasonable?

    thudpucker- Do you suggest a slightly more rounded bottom? Where i sail the chop is never more than say 2 feet- it's a small bay.

    I'll try and get some screenshots.
     
  13. nacra5.8
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 54
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: SF Bay

    nacra5.8 Junior Member

    I was also wondering how much the chine angle matters- if I could have the sides be perfectly straight up and down it would be much easier, but it might not shed water as well.
    Here's some screenshots
     

    Attached Files:

  14. Doug Lord
    Joined: May 2009
    Posts: 16,651
    Likes: 322, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 1362
    Location: Cocoa, Florida

    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    ==================
    Again: "unknown file type" Can't you post a jpeg?
     

  15. nacra5.8
    Joined: Sep 2011
    Posts: 54
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: SF Bay

    nacra5.8 Junior Member

    Yeah, I'll go jpeg
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.