Silk/glass

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Martin Baiada, May 15, 2017.

  1. Martin Baiada
    Joined: May 2017
    Posts: 5
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Hamburg, Pa.

    Martin Baiada Junior Member

    I have an old 16' Canoe and hope to improve on it's strength when under a load of say, 525 lbs. If, the current hull is used as a core, what material(s) do I use to add the least weight?
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 13,768
    Likes: 431, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    Firstly, why do you think it needs strengthening? Secondly, what is it built of?
     
  3. Martin Baiada
    Joined: May 2017
    Posts: 5
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Hamburg, Pa.

    Martin Baiada Junior Member

    It's probably a 60's era canoe and the gel coat is crazed. It has a few glass patches in the bottom. I ripped out a portion covering the keel from the inside, then snapped it in half. It's chopped fiberglass strands and resin with a gel coat. From what I see, the glass and resin were sprayed onto two forms then, joined at the keel.

    This is a project boat and want something "seaworthy". I want it to slid over a rock or two without cracking. Besides this, I'd be embarrassed, if, my foot went through the hull on it's maiden voyage.
     
  4. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Posts: 2,091
    Likes: 186, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 506
    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    You can probably buy a different canoe that's in much better shape than it will cost to try and fix this one. Sell, or give it away and buy what you need.
     
  5. Martin Baiada
    Joined: May 2017
    Posts: 5
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Hamburg, Pa.

    Martin Baiada Junior Member

    Before, I call it a day with this boat, is there a simple way to test it?
     
  6. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
    Posts: 2,091
    Likes: 186, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 506
    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    Test what aspect?

    If it floats it's usable as is, if it doesn't it's not worth fixing.

    Unfortunately these canoes were mass produced with little thought in longevity and the same amount in skill and attention to detail.
     

  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 473, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    You have a few options, none cheap. You can use the hull as a "buck" and make a new one, using the old as a form. You can simply skin the old, with more fabric, though weight will go up, capacity will go down and you're still married to the old busted up boat, which the new one is glued to. You could remove the gelcoat and say half of the old laminate, with a peeler or grinder and bulk up the hull shell with more fabric. This will keep the weight down and greatly strengthen what you have, but this is a lot of work and materials. I'd be inclined to suggest finding another canoe for a few hundred bucks. You'll spend more than this is goo and fabrics reinforcing the one you have.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.