Ship dictionary terminology

Discussion in 'Projects & Proposals' started by sinmania, Jan 14, 2014.

  1. sinmania
    Joined: Sep 2012
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    sinmania Junior Member

    Hey guys I have an idea. Lets gather all different terminologies used in ship construction, and put them in one excel file with, one colm english term, one russian, french etc.. one colmn description - what it means, one measure - how is measured, and one calculation how to calculate the dimensions... Also it can spread to piping, hvac, electricity terminology etc... I think this will be usefull project for everybody trying to understand ship construction... With one colmn pictures showing the explained term with arrow from 2 views, 2 different pictures.. [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    It can be done also with the termionogy used in different softwares....

    If someone wants to join is welcome!
     
  2. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  3. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

  4. sinmania
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    sinmania Junior Member

    I was thinking something more visual with pictures.. but I guess this will be my resources... So maybe when I done something I will share... table download example...
     
  5. Heiwa
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Definitions

    In order to assist visitors (and journalists?) to my web pages about M/S Costa Concordia, her shipowner and Master at http://heiwaco.tripod.com/news8.htm, below are definitions of some words used:
    •Seaworthy: A seaworthy ship provides its crew and passengers a safe place to work and live and is equipped with appropriate safety gear and equipment, safe recreation facilities and a competent and trained crew. M/S Costa Concordia was evidently not seaworthy 13 January, 2012, and it was just a matter of time when something went wrong.
    •Hull: watertight part of a ship on which it's mass floats according to the principle of Archimedes.
    •Superstructure: weather tight part of a ship above its hull, i.e. the openings are protected to prevent green water to enter.
    •Deck house: part of a ship above its hull or superstructure, which is neither watertight nor weather tight, i.e. the openings are protected only to prevent wind, rain and water spray to enter.*
    •Up flooding: the filling of water of a hull compartment from below through, e.g. a hull leakage due to a stupid contact or grounding.
    •Progressive flooding; the filling of water of an intact hull compartment from an adjacent, up flooded compartment, via, e.g. an open, watertight door.
    •Down flooding: the filling of water of an intact hull compartment from above, e.g. when the top of the compartment is below water due to excessive heeling, e.g. after the capsize of the ship.
    •Contact: ship touching some fixed object causing structural damage to the hull.
    •Capsize: floating ship losing stability, e.g. due to free water in the hull, and heeling >90°.
    •Collision: ship striking another ship or floating object.
    •Grounding: ship's bottom striking and getting stuck on the bottom of the sea. A grounded ship with double bottom cannot really sink. It remains upright on the ground.
    •Buoyancy: force to keep an object, e.g. a ship, floating*. This force is a function of the submerged volume of the object. A not submerged part of the object does not produce buoyancy, e.g. only the submerged part of a sponsoon produces buoyancy.
    •Sinking of ship: when the force of the ship's mass exceeds its buoyancy, e.g. due to up flooding, progressive flooding and down flooding, the vessel sinks.
    •Sponsoon: tank attached to hull to produce buoyancy when filled with air.
    •Double bottom: bottom of passenger ships normally consists of an outer shell and an inner watertight deck to form a double bottom as protection against grounding, i.e. outer shell may be damaged, while, hopefully, the inner deck/bottom remains tight in order to reduce up flooding to double bottom only.
    •Muster station: defined location aboard a ship where passengers gather to abandon ship. Each passenger is allocated a muster station. Appointed crew will escort passengers from the muster station to lifeboats and life rafts.

    (*The Swedish Maritime Authority, Sjöfartsverket, believes that all deck houses are watertight and that a ship like M/S Estonia floats on the deck house)

    Media reporters and journalists are kindly recommended to correctly use above words when reporting about ship incidents and to link to my site when reporting about M/S Costa Concordia. Please do not suggest that a ship runs aground and sinks, only landlubbers think so.
     
  6. FMS
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    FMS Senior Member

    Visitors and journalists should start with a neutral set of definitions not one written to lead them to a particular conclusion.

    Most boats are sinkable given the wrong circumstances.
     
  7. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    It is hard to sink while aground, but once the hull slips off the grounding point, that is another matter.
     
  8. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    Funny that someone who claims to teach to speak, in naval terms, with such a long series of definitions, is allowed to say:
    Even a landlubber can deduce that a ship runs aground can turn around but it is impossible to sink. But that is not necessary to know what is a Muster Station and all that stuff, but use common sense.
     
  9. Heiwa
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    If you once slip off the grounding point, you are evidently not aground anymore. But it is difficult to slip off any grounding point. Maybe your engine/prop can do it alone or you ask for help from ships around. But before slipping off check that your ship is watertight!
     
  10. Heiwa
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Landlubbers know little about what happens at sea and when media says that running aground or up on submerged land below water means sinking, they believe it. If you think I am wrong earn €1 000 000 at http://heiwaco.tripod.com/chall.htm

    Landlubbers buying cheap cruises to play golf, watch magic shows, swim in a pool etc. on cheap cruise ships in January believe they are ashore on a cheap hotel that is moved around someway. Muster station? The landlubbers haven't a clue? Common sense? They left it at home.
     
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  11. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Is it really so difficult? What if you run aground when the tide is out?
    When the tide is in you have lost the edge and can be swept into deep water.
     
  12. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    I try to avoid the floating hotels. So far I have had 100% success.
     
  13. Heiwa
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    If you run aground when the tide is out, you may refloat and continue the voyage, when the tide is in, if you haven't lost too much buoyancy. Otherwise you will remain aground and displace lower on the ground and will therefore not sink. The ground prevents you from sinking.
    Many things happen at sea but no ship sinks when it runs aground regardless of tide.
    Only landlubbers and idiots believe otherwise and they should not be allowed aboard a ship ... unless it is a cheap, not seaworthy, low cost, no safety at sea ship designed for them and approved by USCG and the US department of Homeland Security.
     
  14. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    How awful! Seem a bit overdone your words. The world is just for Smart people and saltwater sailors (what's about the na speaking ex cathedra?). Why should we prohibit mentally handicapped to go by boat?. Some of them are even captains (Costa Concordia) but that would be avoided.
    Otherwise, everything you say is so obvious that it's not worth answering it.
     

  15. Heiwa
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Heiwa Naval architect

    Pls do not quote me 50%.

    Evidently physically handicapped people needing wheelchairs and similar to move around aboard are welcome on most adapted ships nowadays. I work with one to test the competition since many years.

    Re mentally handicapped people I assume there are no restrictions or prohibitions either.

    I was talking about normal US idiots running around everywhere incl. the White House, etc. I thought that was clear.
     
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