Sharkhide on the hull

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by stupidbaker57, Jul 5, 2018.

  1. stupidbaker57
    Joined: Jan 2011
    Posts: 67
    Likes: 4, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 40
    Location: Lakeville Ma

    stupidbaker57 Junior Member

    I have a Chris craft 202 that I keep moored in a lake that has stained the hull with tanic acid. The hull at the end of the 3 month season has a heavy brown stain at and below the waterline. Above the water line the bow gets a light tan stain (hull is white fiberglass) due the the waves splashing while the boat is moored and bouncing up and down from the waves.
    The way I clean this mess off is with Zep acidic toilet bowl cleaner and peroxide. It works great with no harm to the hull.
    Why I tell you this? I don't want the boat looking like a mess. (like all the other white boats on the lake)
    I used Sharkhide metal treatment and so far the boat looks nice. I cleaned the hull with acetone then sprayed it with my auto spray gun. The hull has stayed white for weeks except for a small stain around the waterline. White top and bottom of the waterline.
    This fall the clean up will be easy.
     
  2. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
    Posts: 71
    Likes: 3, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Columbus, GA

    JamesG123 Junior Member

    I hope you aren't using all those chemicals while the boat is in the water. And talking about it on a public web forum. Just sayin'...
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Location: Australia

    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    I had visions of shark skin being used to give a boat a cunning advantage, not so !
     
  4. stupidbaker57
    Joined: Jan 2011
    Posts: 67
    Likes: 4, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 40
    Location: Lakeville Ma

    stupidbaker57 Junior Member

    Applying the sharkskin to the hull while IN the water would be impossible since I want to protect the part of the hull that IS in the water.
     
  5. pacificislander
    Joined: Apr 2018
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: philippines

    pacificislander New Member

    There was an article in Sea People in the late 90s where one person was going to try something like this on his small catamaran, I waited the results but none were forthcoming.......probably difficult to prove effectiveness, unless you applied to only one side of the hull and then sailed/motored in opposite directions. It's all a bit hazy after 20 something years but I seem to recall the idea was to have small "hairs" creating turbulence that would in theory reduce friction on the hull. [N.B. the writers theory NOT mine]
     
  6. JamesG123
    Joined: Mar 2015
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    Likes: 3, Points: 8, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Columbus, GA

    JamesG123 Junior Member


  7. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 824
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    Location: Newport News VA

    sdowney717 Senior Member

    The extra chemicals dumped in the water feed the sea life. Certainly harmful to humans only.
     
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