Severe fiberglass transom damage

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by Mak1999, Jul 1, 2020.

  1. Mak1999
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: North east

    Mak1999 Junior Member

    I was wondering if this is possible to repair. The engine fell off when the last owner hit a pot hole and it looks like it took alot of fiber glass with it. Is it possible to fix? Or maybe completely replace with a wooden transom. I would like it to support a 150hp Yamaha vmax. Or will this area never be able to support an engine the same way again? Does it compromise the structural integrity of the boat?

    *update* I just posted a small clip on YouTube, if anybody is curious:

     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
  2. Mr Efficiency
    Joined: Oct 2010
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It is possible to repair, but it is a matter of whether it is worthwhile, it really needs a close inspection by some experienced hand who can assess the situation. Did the motor leg hit something ?
     
  3. Mak1999
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: North east

    Mak1999 Junior Member

    I was maybe considering rebuild the transom with "wood" to replace the rear entirely. So that the vmax 150 would have a a mounting surface that is rigid enough to support increased weight along with increase torque. Can anybody maybe recommend a brand of material that they prefer to use because of the quality. I would appreciate it and I already do
     
  4. Mak1999
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Mak1999 Junior Member

    Since I havent introduce myself. I am a machinist and here is the boat that is dragging me into this world. It's a 1992 Mako 171
     

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  5. Mak1999
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    Mak1999 Junior Member

    I'm not sure the owner kept the motor and this is what he didnt want to deal with. But I have the tools and the time so I'm trying to begin with some research.
     
  6. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It really needs to be assessed in toto, it wouldn't make sense to just repair the transom, if the framing structure underfoot is shot. Which it may well be.
     
  7. Mak1999
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Mak1999 Junior Member

    You might be right but I really want to rebuild this. I'm fairly mechanically and technically minded so I think I could take on this project. I have a capable little machine shop at my disposal plus we work with a shop that does aerospace bonding and glueing so maybe they could have something to help me here with. I just know nothing really compares to tried and experienced people like you guys here. It's the beauty of the internet. Anyways check out my next comment, I took some better pictures...
     
  8. Mak1999
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Mak1999 Junior Member

    A closer and clearer look
     

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  9. Mak1999
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    Mak1999 Junior Member

    There seems to be some separation but I'm hoping to fix it, even if it comes down to some studs and bolts.
     
  10. ondarvr
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    Location: Monroe WA

    ondarvr Senior Member

    Anything made from fiberglass can be fixed, whether it's worth fixing is a different story.

    Normally if the transom is rotten so is all the other wood in the boat, which means you need to totally gut it.

    The job will take at a minimum several months, as a DIY project it frequently stretches to years.

    And budget several thousand $$$$ for matetials.

    After that it's another outlay of cash for a motor, typically many thousands again for something that works.

    Fixing an old rotten boat is not a cheap or fast way to get on the water.

    So if this looks like a project you be committed to finishing, then yes, go for it.
     
    fallguy likes this.
  11. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The transom failed because the wooden core was rotted. It is not a particularly difficult repair.
     
    brendan gardam likes this.
  12. Mak1999
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Mak1999 Junior Member

    I'm just concerned about the fiberglass tub which has broken. I have been watching alot of videos and the exact process seems to vary boat to boat but basically when rebuilding the transom the remove the plywood covered in fiberglass but leave the inside layer of fiberglass intact. Plus it looks like some of the "streamers" I think they're called are delaminating from the hull slightly and they have a plywood core which has gotten a little water in there soooo.
     
  13. Mak1999
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Mak1999 Junior Member

    I think I have my money back in the trailer alone which is a nice Karavan which a electronic brakes and the T-top has got to be worth something. The idea is that I wanted this as a project to build into a miniature, maneuverable and fast sportfish boat. The project I was considering earlier was a rusty shell of a 1972 Porsche 911 lol
     
  14. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Usually the transom is repaired from the inside. Matching the outside gelcoat and finish is very hard. However, since the fiberglass on the outside is damaged, it makes the structural repair easier. As far as finish, it is a cosmetic issue only.
     

  15. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    There would have been a stress concentration at the bottom of the hull/transom interface at incident. On the hull bottom this would manifest as gc cracking. Otoh, the transom could have been so rotted that it sheared without the stresses, but I doubt zero. This means you will also need to repair the hull bottom there to do things properly.

    More globally, that boat probably has so many issues with other rot that it requires a full gutjob. The going rate for that boat at that age can never be exceeded by all your labor and material and engine and trailer inputs. So, it is economically unwise unless you don't value your time much or the boat when completed has a high value. Look online for that boat and you'll get some idea of market value of a 'good' boat.

    Typically, the economics are poor. This is not the same as fixing a quarter panel on a car.
     
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