Series 60 Model in CAD

Discussion in 'Software' started by deanlife, Mar 30, 2015.

  1. deanlife
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    deanlife Junior Member

    Hi,
    for my project I'm looking for a CAD model (any format) of Series 60 model, cb=0.7, no bulb and no transom.
    This is for a school project which I have a experimental seakeeping results and I will try to modify the hull lines to improve in someway seakeeping performances.

    Thank you all
     
  2. deanlife
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    deanlife Junior Member

    Anyone? :(
     
  3. Dr34m3r
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    Dr34m3r Senior Member

    Hope your teacher gave you series 60 table ? then calculate the offsets and create model :9
     
  4. deanlife
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    deanlife Junior Member

    I tried, I have all offsets but I cant surface in a good way.
    I mean, I use loft in Rhino with all offsets, do you guys have any recomendation on how create surface after having offsets?
     
  5. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    The easiest and best, in my opinion, is to draw water lines and use the loft command with them.
     
  6. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    That is an interesting suggestion. When I have to loft a hull from 2-D lines, I usually draw transverse sections and then loft these. And there are always problems in the bow area, which require a separate loft (or even two).

    Are you suggesting that lofting the water lines can simplify the process and avoid some of the above problems?

    Cheers
     
  7. Dr34m3r
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    Dr34m3r Senior Member

    I would go for transverse section lofting, which give better hull shape
     
  8. TANSL
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    TANSL Senior Member

    The best thing you can do is what you like better, that with which you feel most comfortable.
    My experience with most of the models I've done is that, problems always arise at the ends of the bow and stern, are resolved much better using the water lines. In hulls like modern tugs or fishing vessels, which have very special skegs, water lines produce outstanding results. In chine hulls and very pronounced knuckles, the cross sections may have advantages but the bow always give problems. You can combine both methods.
    In hulls with very angular shapes the best could be to forget both methods and use the lines of chine, knuckles, deck or bulwark and, taken 2 by 2, apply the loft command.
     
  9. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Thanks, I will try the waterlines lofting method. :)
     
  10. deanlife
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    deanlife Junior Member

    What is transverse section lofting?
     
  11. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    It means to use the transverse sections as intermediate sections for the loft command. It creates a loft in the X direction.

    The method suggested by TANSL consists in lofting in the Z direction, with waterlines as intermediate sections.
     

  12. deanlife
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    deanlife Junior Member

    Got it.
     
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