Salt water wash pump pressure switch and valve

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by sdowney717, Sep 16, 2013.

  1. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 955
    Likes: 54, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 274
    Location: Newport News VA

    sdowney717 Senior Member

    I fixed the old jabsco AC pump and put together this.
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    I put it on the boat and it works. When the water pressure in the hose falls by pulling the water handle, the switch closes and the pump runs till you let go the hose handle, the pressure builds and switch opens and the pump stops.

    So now I have a wash down pump working on demand.

    The white PVC valve works much better than the swing check. I tested the swing check and it leaked back.

    This is installed in the aft of the boat. I am thinking use a plastic y-splitter and run a hose up to the front through the bilge so you can wash the mud off the anchor.

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    This valve does not have threads. So I bought PVC risers, cut the screw threads off. Still slightly bigger so it would not slip in to valve. I used a hot air gun to heat soften the pvc and pushed it into valve. This reshaped it to fit. Then I glued it in with PVC cement. Otherwise I would have had to buy a 3/4 pvc pipe and two female threaded ends, so doing what I did was cheaper.

    I totally disassembled the pressure switch and where the salt water would go, sealed the metal with 'SealAll', so the salt water can not cause it to rust on the inside..

    I had all the parts here, just needed the PCV parts to make it work. the bronze and brass bits, should last a while.
     
  2. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 955
    Likes: 54, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 274
    Location: Newport News VA

    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Using a discharge hose from a dishwasher. this is perfect for what I want to do.
    I drilled a 1.25 inch hole in the deck above the anchor locker.
    I glued in a PVC 1 inch female slip fitting with female threads (smoothed the fitting edge first).

    Got a plastic female screw on hose mender.
    Cut the discharge fitting back to the 5/8 mark and attached it.

    Took an old 1/2 inch garden hose in good shape which runs in the bilge area from the pump in the aft compartment all the way to the anchor locker.

    Connect the other end of the dishwasher hose to the garden hose.

    The good thing about this GE dishwasher discharge hose it is white, very flexible, easily slides through the fitting and is long enough perhaps 7 feet to be useful up at the anchor. And it has already a nice soft rubber attachment point on the ends.
    The plastic hose faucet will stick up off the deck, but it is way up front on the bow, in front of the windless, will not get in the way at all.

    I got the female hose mender at wal-mart.

    Simply grab handle, pull up and white hose comes out of anchor locker.
    Then when done, it slips back into anchor locker and sits inside the fitting so all you see is the hose end and hose faucet.

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  3. sdowney717
    Joined: Nov 2010
    Posts: 955
    Likes: 54, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 274
    Location: Newport News VA

    sdowney717 Senior Member

    Garden hose in boat joining dishwasher discharge hose using clamps and a copper pipe.
    [​IMG]

    Rope on one side and hose on the other. It so far works fine.
    [​IMG]

    Pump and valve sits in a cosy dry spot under the aft deck.
    I need to secure the wires up.
    Pump comes on when nozzle handle pulled and goes off when let go of handle.
    This pump does flow a good amount and also enough pressure to shoot a stream maybe 20 feet.
    It is sharing the thruhull with the AC heat pump and both can run at the same time.
    I secured it all using a oil jug cut into strips with SS screws.
    That really holds well anything I have wished to secure.
    [​IMG]
     
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