Sail Boat Plans 34 to 40 feet Round bilge

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by IanH, Mar 21, 2019.

  1. IanH
    Joined: Mar 2019
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    Location: UK

    IanH New Member

    Hi. Everyone.

    I am looking for plans for a self build cruising yacht.
    Around 34 to 40 feet
    Round bilge so cold molded, strip plank or solid grp

    I’ve looked at Van De Stadt and Bruce Roberts but many of the designs seem to have been around for a long time and not to be rude but do look a bit dated.

    Any other vendors I should be looking at.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    One of them could be Dudley Dix . . . :)
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
  3. Rurudyne
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: North Texas

    Rurudyne Senior Member

    My two cents as another guy who'd love to build too.

    Classic proportions (which just make for pretty boats) could be mixed with "modern styling" if desired. You don't have to finish the superficial detailing of house and interior to specs so much as the framing and sail plan. Get a design with good bones, the performance, ease of handling and comfort you desire ... and then worry about the makeup on her face. The NA may be very helpful on this directly, they may even be waiting for someone just like you: the answer will always be "no" if you never ask.

    And don't forget to post pictures of your build!
     
  4. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    A boat of that sort, if self built, may very well take ten years or more. Are you aware of that grim reality. More large projects like that are abandoned somewhere down the line than those that are actually completed.

    Not to be a naysayer but you need to know what you are getting into before you begin. Truth of the matter is that you will not save money. You can buy a used 34 to 40 footer for less that it will cost to build, never mind the long term sweat, fatigue, frustration, and divorce court on your part.
     
  5. IanH
    Joined: Mar 2019
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    Location: UK

    IanH New Member

    Hi. Folks

    Thanks for the reply’s I’ll check out Dudley Dix. Going direct to a NA may be an option. I know it’s a big project but that’s ok I’ve fitted out two bare hulls built a car a house and am currently building an aircraft before going back to construction of an extension to the house. I’m always planning a couple of projects ahead hoping I’ve got a boat left in me

    I’ve looked at a couple of storm damaged boats mainly due to cost as that is a big factor but they can be a can of worms. I’ve not ruled out buying an older boat and re fitting it. But I love building stuff
     
  6. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Best establish first a budget in available building time and money, and see if the boat build plans fit in.

    And best also write a SOR (Statement of Requirements) which helps to make a choice from the available plans.

    See also Tad Roberts for plans sail 30' and over (forum member Tad)

    Dudley is on the forum too, but is currently not active here.
     
  7. M&M Ovenden
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Ottawa

    M&M Ovenden Senior Member

    Hi Ian,

    Don't forget you can also use metal. Once you get up to that 36-40' point steel becomes an attractive material (depends on displacement). With numerical cutting these days it's a good option for one off builds.

    Cheers,
    Mark
     
  8. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Which displacement for an about 36' sailboat is the turning point that steel becomes viable as a building material ?
     
  9. M&M Ovenden
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Ottawa

    M&M Ovenden Senior Member

    Hi Angelique,

    Real rough, I would say anything that can use 10 gauge plate. Once you get to sizes using 3/16" things look even better. We use 1/4" plate on the hull bottom and keel sides, 3/16" for most of the hull and deck, 10 gauge for bulwarks and cabin tops.

    Cheers,
    Mark
     
    Angélique likes this.

  10. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Thanks for the reply Mark,

    I'm afraid that further asking about this here would derail the original subject of this thread, so I've started a split off thread about it.

    Everyone's input about this matter is welcome on the new thread: Conversion of a plywood boat design to a steel build ?
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2019
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