RYA sailing courses

Discussion in 'Education' started by guzzis3, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. guzzis3
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: Brisbane

    guzzis3 Senior Member

    Hi all,

    I've searched back and haven't found much on this.

    What do people think of the RYA sailing courses ? I'm not interested in working on boats or anything but I thought they might be useful to fill any gaps in my knowledge etc. for my own cruising.

    I found this online provider and was thinking of doing the theory for day skipper, coastal and maybe ocean yachtmaster through them and doing the practicals at one of the queensland providers.

    http://www.navathome.com.au/rya_distance_learning.aspx

    Any thoughts appreciated.
     
  2. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Stumble Senior Member

    I don't know those courses specifically, but I think class room time can be a huge asset in building new skills. Honestly though the best think we did when the family went cruising was when my dad took a six month course in diesel engine repair from the local trade school. Being able to repair the engines assuming the right parts was probably more important than having better navigation skills.

    For those of you who can rebuild engines already.... Well this doesn't apply.
     
  3. guzzis3
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: Brisbane

    guzzis3 Senior Member

    I did a 4 year course in motor vehicle repair, so the engine is the least scary bit on a boat for me :)

    Thank you for the comment.
     
  4. Frosty

    Frosty Previous Member

    I went for an RYA course for something to do. The guy in the office in Phuket said we all go out in his 40 foot Benetau and learn sailng , I said but I have a 62 foot sloop in the marina , Oh no he said I must charter his, I said I don't think you could handle mine into the Marina and I can handle yours. This did'nt go down well so I left the office.

    I met a guy once who bought his off shore and he asked me one day what were the little numbers for all over the chart. If RYA is reading this please PM me.

    The most fearsome sailor after a Sunsail charter skipper is a man with an RYA offshore license.

    I am impressed when a yacht comes in flying a Q flag , jumps off and says Ive just come from New Zealand.
     
  5. guzzis3
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    guzzis3 Senior Member

    He'd been awarded yachtmaster and couldn't read a chart ?

    I doubt the certificate would make me cocky. I'm a proud coward when it comes to sailing, I don't even like being caught off my anchor after dusk. I certainly don't head out in big water and nasty winds. :)

    I just thought I might learn something useful. So you reckon they are a waste of money ?
     
  6. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    Guzzis,

    Assuming the teacher is any good you should learn a lot. On the other hand....

    I am in the states so I don't know much about the RYA classes, but here they can be hit or miss.
     
  7. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    You have to start somewhere. The yachtmaster is good. After that it take a lifetime to learn how to become a seaman. Go for it.

    Do the homestudy to learn the terms ,then do the yacht based class. Nothing wrong with buying a rowboat and a handbearing compass to practice with while you home study'
     

  8. guzzis3
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    Location: Brisbane

    guzzis3 Senior Member

    Thank you for the comments.

    I've actually been sailing for 20 years and can navigate and so forth. In fact I rely less on the auxiliary than a lot of other people I see about the place.

    I just thought doing a formal course might fill in some gaps and learn me some new stuff. Perhaps I'm mistaken.

    I had a chat to a chap who teaches these courses about 2 years back and that is what got me thinking. From what he said they got the students to do some scary stuff, eg sending the skipper below with no electronics and getting him to navigate the boat up to a mooring. I don't know how I'd do that ? If you can't come up to take any sort of fix you'd have to start with a position and assume speed all the way to the mooring. ?

    Anyway...
     
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