rot resistant wood question

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by pescaloco, Feb 18, 2010.

  1. pescaloco
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    pescaloco Senior Member

    Hi

    Allthough the application is not for a boat I'm sure sombody will have a suggestion or two.

    What is needed is a rot resistant wood for use in the construction of floating bait barge boxes in saltwater, would like a wood available in the South western USA or Baja Mexico. Materials will consist of some 2x4 material 2x6 and a lot of strip plank type material 1/4 or 1/2 in thick by 1 in wide by 8 to 10 feet long. Any suggestion would be appreciated, even means of assembly meaning faster type or technique.

    Thanks
     
  2. GG
    Joined: Jan 2008
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    Location: MICH

    GG offshore artie

    Coosa is a material that is stronger then wood lighter and will never rot put you might need some assembly for achieving the desired thickness that you want and it can be purchased from here www.advanced-plastics.com
     
  3. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    Location: OREGON

    rasorinc Senior Member

    composits qre the only wat to go for you. here is a source of HDPE. For fasteners use Silicon bronze for salt water exposure.
    http://www.inlandplywood.com/SEABOARD.htm

    3M makes a specific adhesive for HDPE.
     
  4. The copper guy
    Joined: Feb 2010
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    The copper guy Junior Member

    The plastic wood as above is the best for your purpose' Coosa or other.
    It can be shaped/Bent/twisted etc with the use of a simple heat gun????

    However if you want wood CYPRESS is of coarse unbeatable this wood is from the swamp and in the swamp"s they use it for everything!!!!

    You may want to consider fastening with copper ring nails (you will have to pre drill.
    Whatever you fasten with, Dew to much handling they will require something
    more. (a short peace of canvas fire hose on each corner?)
    Also some kind of hinge will be needed???
    My suggestion would be webbing? also attached with copper ring 1/4inch(nylon rope will rot in the sun)Canvas webbing will last a long time(Fire hose again perhaps??) This would also make good fending around the box.
    If you are shore based why not set up a tank with salt water pump"s
    I worked in a bait shack and set up several such tank"s and i also have a list of suppliers for the copper ring nails.
    please don't hesitate to contact me if you need anything. The copper guy
     
  5. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    you might check out white oak ( which I have laying around )
     
  6. alan white
    Joined: Mar 2007
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    alan white Senior Member

    White oak is heavy but won't rot easily, especially in salt water. Yellow pine, pressure treated and available anywhere, will be somewhat lighter and it will last almost indefinitely without rotting. Cedars are probably not tough enough though they are very light and relatively rot resistant.
    Plastic has poor stiffness, tending to sag over spans that would be no problem for real wood. Plastic is expensive too. It is, however, inert, and underwater, it won't decay. The sun can break down plastic over time.
     
  7. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    ya I would not recommend plastics either
    we have enough of that stuff floating round in the oceans already
     
  8. CDK
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    CDK retired engineer

    There is a tropical hardwood called meranti. Reddish brown, doesn't rot and is not attacked by insects. One of the few types that can be used outside without any treatment. Cheaper than oak, but very strong and also heavy.
     
  9. pescaloco
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    pescaloco Senior Member

    Guys thank you ALL for the suggestions.

    I was thinking pressure treated for the demensional lumber, but did'nt know for the slat material. Alan is your suggestion plain Yellow Pine or is it a pressure treated material ?

    Where does a person get high quality fasterens these days that are not Chinese junk ? No offense to the Chinese ofcourse.
     
  10. Hunter25
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: Orlando

    Hunter25 Senior Member

    Use pressure treated throughout your project. This is what it was designed for but you should check to see that the CA poisons used to treat the lumber will not kill your bait too. The thinner stuff you were asking about can be ripped from 2 x 4 or 4 x 4 material. Special screws need to be used with the new PT lumber treatments. All big box stores carry these types of screws, but check for submersion compatibility.
     
  11. The copper guy
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    The copper guy Junior Member

    whatever you do do not use pressure treated wood it will kill your bait m8
     
  12. pescaloco
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    pescaloco Senior Member

    Thank you !!!!!!!!

    We are in the begining stages of researching this
     
  13. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    go with a naturally rot resistant wood
    white oak
    black locust
    cedar
    your bound to get better results

    cheers
    B
     
  14. alan white
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    alan white Senior Member

    The fact is, finding untreated yellow pine is not as easy as finding the treated stuff. I see no problem with pressure-treated. Look for moderately dry suff with few knots and straight grain. Your particular needs are not too critical. pick through the piles, and avoid box stores. They store the wood indoors, which causes the wood to warp. Check out lumber yards that store the stuff outside under a shed roof.
    If treated wood kills bait, try if you can to get some untreated yellow pine. In salt water, it does well and it's a tough wood.
     

  15. pescaloco
    Joined: Feb 2006
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    Location: so. california

    pescaloco Senior Member

    Thanks Guys

    You know Allan I never put it together that box stores indoor climate made their wood warp and cupp, just thought it was junk...........that makes sense
    thanks
     
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