Richard Woods Flica 34' plywood/epoxy Build

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by mariobrothers88, Dec 14, 2020.

  1. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    You don't use a gelcoat if painting.

    After you lay the wovens on, you may see some areas you don't like. You use a fairing compound on them and wovens get neat coated with plain epoxy at a rate of about 2 oz per yard. I like to use an adhesive roller for neat coating. Home Depot sells them, but I usually cut them down from 9" to more like about 4". Moc the epoxy in a gallon pail so it doesn't kick as fast. You will probably need to sand before neat coats, make sure to sand lightly to not burn thru!

    If you are careful, you need about 2-3 neat coats for the boat to start looking nice and the weave to vanish.

    Alternatively, you can put a fairing compound over the entire boat if you feel it is filling a bit, sand and then a neat coat or two. So much depends on your final finish wishes. If you are less concerned with final finish, I'd still neat coat to protect the glass.

    For paint, prep sand from 120-180 or as instructed if otherwise.

    You need primer for the perfection and I ised interlux 2000e on my bottom for a primer. I really like the interlux 2000e and wish I had used it for the entire boat. It flows out pretty nice with fine rollers.

    For your area, the primers will kick pretty fast, so you need to think through keeping a wet edge. My boat wraps all the way around and has no defined deck, but traction paint up top allowed for a wet edge at the gunwhale. I taped a line at the bow and started on one side and went all the way around. (Actually a bit on the top first that was taped off.
     
  2. mariobrothers88
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Thank you so much fallguy!

    When you say "neat coat" it's pretty much just a layer of plain epoxy correct? "Fill coat" and "neat coats" are pretty much the same thing right?

    Tha
     
  3. mariobrothers88
    Joined: Sep 2020
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Hey guys, after reading the Epoxy Basics ebook by Russell Brown, I'm still confused. I plan to put a layer of epoxy on the chine joint, then lay the biaxial fiberglass and wet it out with epoxy. Then do I need to do a fill coat, or can I just put the next strip of biaxial fiberglass? After the second strip, do I put a fill coat or lay the 10 oz plain weave glass over the entire hull and do the fill coat after all that?

    Thanks for all the help and input guys, I truly appreciate it!!
     
  4. mariobrothers88
    Joined: Sep 2020
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    As I was putting the 10 oz plain weave fiberglass over the hull, there was an area that wouldn't take up epoxy completely and become clear (see photo below). I think in that area, I was getting towards the bottom of the cup of epoxy and the epoxy was starting to kick and become hard and wouldn't fill the weave of the fiberglass well. I tried adding more epoxy but it still wouldn't take it up and turn clear. Should I just grind out this area and replace the 10 oz fiberglass/epoxy?

    Thanks for all your help guys!!

     

    Attached Files:

  5. Milehog
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    Maybe hit the cloth that didn't wet out with a heat gun and peel it off? Grinding-sanding green epoxy scares me.
     
  6. mariobrothers88
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Thanks for the reply milehog! What do you mean by "green" epoxy exactly and why does it scare you?

    Sorry for the newb questions!
     
  7. Milehog
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Milehog Clever Quip

    Green epoxy is firm but not fully cured. besides gumming up sand paper it's dust is a health hazard. Cured epoxy is pretty much inert.
    Green epoxy is easy to cut. The bubble you posted earlier, if a manageable size, could possibly be cut out rather than sanded out before applying a patch. After cutting the bubble off I'd sand the substrate to give the epoxy tooth.
    I assumed you were going to grind the bubbles out right away upon discovery, possibly before the epoxy cured.

    Russel Brown's work is very neat, I have his books too. He has a series of videos over at Off Center Harbor but a subscription is required to view them.
     

  8. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Grind it out with 40 grit and remove all loose edges. Bond a new piece in and lightly sand the margin.

    I never do any sanding or grinding without gloves and an N95 mask. I got an epoxy dermatitus from degloving same way and just touching one spot on my wrist repeatedly.. I might have some allergy from all the work; not sure, but recently I have a cough now and then working on the boat. But it is outdoors, so could be pollen or molds.
     
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