Richard Woods Flica 34' plywood/epoxy Build

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by mariobrothers88, Dec 14, 2020.

  1. mariobrothers88
    Joined: Sep 2020
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    Location: San Diego, CA

    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Hi guys, per the advice of the great members of this community, I figured I will start a thread regarding this build. I will post pics and progress here!

    Today I glued some timbers to bulkheads, did roundovers with the router on the stringers, and cut out notches in the bulkheads for the stringers. Fun times.

    To join the hull panels, Richard Woods suggests just using butt straps to simplify but I could scarf the hull panels together as well. I scarfed the keel panels with the router and a jig I built, but the jig would be too small to scarf a big sheet of plywood. Do you guys recommend scarfing the hull panels and what is your preferred method to scarf them?

    I am currently planning the build site still, and I was wondering what is the best way to turn the hulls over? I was thinking of using 2x4s to build a temporary roof covered with heavy duty tarp. I would have to make it strong enough to flip the hull.

    Thanks for all the help and advice guys, I really appreciate it!!
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Heimfried
    Joined: Apr 2015
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    Location: Berlin, Germany

    Heimfried Senior Member

    May be this would be an option:


    I did it with a staggering batch of plywood panels and using a belt sander and a vac at first:
    boote-forum.de - Das Forum rund um Boote https://www.boote-forum.de/showthread.php?p=4422627&#post4422627

    After I was tired of the noise, I changed to a plane:
    boote-forum.de - Das Forum rund um Boote https://www.boote-forum.de/showthread.php?p=4423198&#post4423198
    The different colors of the plies provide a good guide to plane evenly.

    To minimize the volume of the wood to be removed by sander or plane, I cut it with a hand held circular saw and used a chisel for the first steps.
    boote-forum.de - Das Forum rund um Boote https://www.boote-forum.de/showthread.php?p=4423507&#post4423507

    The panels were 2.5 m wide.
     
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  3. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Good to see more epoxy on those bulkhead seams.

    all personal preference

    I can tell you that seams are NOT supposed to be on bulkheads.
     
  4. mariobrothers88
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Hey Fallguy thanks for your reply! Are you saying I should add more epoxy to the gap between the timbers? Thanks again for all your help!!!
     
  5. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Things look good.

    What I am telling you is hull panel seams are not supposed to be right on bulkheads.
     
  6. mariobrothers88
    Joined: Sep 2020
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Hey guys I just completed these frames. I'm going to be attaching tarps from the concrete walls to the frames to keep out the sun/rain. I'm going to be buying the lumber to make the strongback tomorrow, will probably buy 6 units of 2"x10-12"x12' and attaching them with half lap joints. Do you guys have any recommendations to make the length of the half lap into the 2x12 or 2x10? I was thinking 12". Also is the best way to join them with screw AND wood glue or would screws alone be enough? I wanted to reuse the strongback for the other hull so I want to be able to disassemble it pretty easily by using just screws, but I'm worried the strongback might move.
     

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  7. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    2' overlaps, no glue 6 screws one side 4 the other; reuse x12s for scaffold planking, etc., avoid screwing more than 4" from the end so they don't break
     
  8. mariobrothers88
    Joined: Sep 2020
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Hi fallguy thanks for the tips!! Did you mean to say avoid screwing less than 4" or more than 4"? Wouldn't it be important to put at least a few screws through the middle of the joint more than 4" from the edge? Thanks again for all your help!!
     
  9. Rumars
    Joined: Mar 2013
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    Location: Germany

    Rumars Senior Member

    Why use half lap joints? Buy some 1" ply, cut a 2ft strip and use it as a buttplate for the timber. If you want it bulletproof, use a buttplate each side of the joint and troughbolt.
     
  10. fallguy
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    fallguy Senior Member

    No screw within 4" of the end so you don't crack up the board
     
  11. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If you consider the years it will take for the build and the money involved, a truss roof will be a great investment. Standard trusses are not too expensive
     
  12. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    he really is correct

    what most likely will happen is at some point you will grow weary of the tarp system; perhaps firther along when the hulls are together; the sun degrades epoxy rapidly and will force you to paint quickly

    my China hoop tent survived some 40mph winds yesterday, it will be available next summer, but fitting it over the concrete walls will be rather impossible and the distance too great
     
  13. mariobrothers88
    Joined: Sep 2020
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    mariobrothers88 Senior Member

    Hey guys thanks for all the great tips and advice!! I put up the tarp yesterday but I'm not sure how long it will last it we get some Santa Ana wind events so I am considering building something more permanent. I know rain will slow down the project since I can't sheath, fair, or paint, but will it cause structural damage to the boat itself if the tarp develops leaks? We really don't get that much rain but I don't want to be stressing out about it causing damage to the boat if we do get rain.

    Also how important is it that I block the sun given that I'm using the uv inhibited epoxy system from raka which they claim is uv resistant? The reason why I ask is that since the sun comes in at an angle, about a third of the build site is exposed to the sun anyway.

    Thanks everyone for all the great advice and happy holidays!!!
     
  14. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Rain will cause damage on areas that are not completely encapsulated, as in the middle of a build. Water can go in through a tiny hole or crack, but won't come out easily. That will eventually turn into rotted wood. Also, the UV from the sun will deteriorate the epoxy.
     
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  15. fallguy
    Joined: Dec 2016
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    fallguy Senior Member

    Biggest problem I had when I put the boat outside was rain finding every crevice.

    Closing the boat or fillet n tape tabbing on wet wood is a big nono as Gonzo says
     
    rwatson likes this.
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