restoring a 1919 Colin Archer

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by ironbearmarine, Sep 15, 2010.

  1. peter radclyffe
    Joined: Mar 2009
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    Location: europe

    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    thank you, at first i thought maybe abeking & rasmussen may have built her, until i saw the carlins, i have never seen these in angle on a composite boat, the frames appear to have been very well formed/fair, but i guess Richard would know if anyone here does, i dont know enough about german yards
     
  2. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Burmester was my first thought, but this boat was built before they came into business.

    Rasmussen did not like the heavy Norwegian way, so, I doubt that. Though it is possible.
    But every A&R boat I have ever seen has the "Ziergöhl" (coverline) of A&R *, which is not removable except you replace the plank. And who would replace the hallmark of the very best yard in the world?

    It seems to be a build in the Bremen region, Hamburg did not have much to do with little boats, and the Baltic yards did not build many yachts.

    If you want me to chase that down, I can do some investigation. We know almost every single boat ever built in Germany. ??

    Regards
    Richard

    *
    [​IMG]
     
  3. peter radclyffe
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 1,415
    Likes: 61, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 680
    Location: europe

    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    yes thanks Richard, but i dont want to waste your time
     
  4. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Hey,

    that is our obligation, hobby, and addiction..........
    You cannot waste my time. I can!

    And this is how I see a yacht transom executed well:

    [​IMG]

    Abeking & Rasmussen

    Regards
    Richard
     
  5. ironbearmarine
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Location: Alameda, Ca

    ironbearmarine Junior Member

    I do know she started out as a working cutter and not a yacht. The sticks are only 10 years old and the main mast step has the original iron boot that is round and riveted in place. The mizzen is deck mounted. She started as a flush deck as I have a logbook which mentions the raised cabin installation, which has an inner steel framing welded to the iron frame where a cargo hatch may have been. Every where else the framing and bulkheads are riveted in place.
     
  6. peter radclyffe
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 1,415
    Likes: 61, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 680
    Location: europe

    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    yes, the carlins may not be original
     

  7. ironbearmarine
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Location: Alameda, Ca

    ironbearmarine Junior Member

    I found some nice rot under the port carlin. I was expecting it. Also as the carlin is angle iron, there is a great deal of rust on the lower leg. It will take about 2 days to cut out the old carlin, replace the bad wood, and put in a new piece of iron. No welding, and I will use metal cutting power saws, so no sparks, fumes or dust. Only one partial deck beam is rotted. Time to repair the canvas boat cover. The weather is changing.
     
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