Resistance and rowing questions?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Murky Deep, Nov 20, 2022.

  1. Murky Deep
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: Massachusetts

    Murky Deep Junior Member

    F746A430-AADA-472B-9C6B-27DE5CAD6422.jpeg I have not posted in some time however I enjoy reading the site.
    Over the past three months I built a seal
    cove skiff in plywood. It is a great solo or two person pond/ bay boat, catching plenty of fish despite the late season launch. Now I want a larger one, up to 17-18 feet.

    I enjoy quiet boating, oars, electrical power, and small, quiet four stroke engines. At the same time I am very practical about what is required to be on the ocean, along with the difference between bays, sounds, and truly open water (where my boats aren’t going).

    What I am trying to understand is how to select a design for sounds and bays that can fish with 2-3 men, under low/minimal power (torqueedo 3hp, 5 hp 4 stroke) to cruise out to the grounds (usually only 1-2 miles distant. I like to row on the grounds to approach feeding fish quietly. The goal would be one guy rowing in the center while the other two cast bow and stern. I do not need to go fast, or very far. I’m not interested in being out in strong winds or seas over 2 ft. I live close to the ocean and can pick my days.

    I’m aware that almost no one else is interested in what I am looking for. I would build a Culler Long John except it is beyond the length limit for my mooring. If Redmonds bluegill skiff was 17 ft long I would have already built it. The towee skiffs are a meant for more power, otherwise they would fit the requirements.

    I have a fairly good sized pile of marine plywood at my disposal 3/8-1/2.” After reading what I wrote above I do sound a bit crazy, but that’s what I’m looking for.

    This looks interesting: FAO Fisheries & Aquaculture https://www.fao.org/fishery/en/vesseldesign/mlw-6

    How do I know how hard it will be to row? Could it have a small sail?
     
  2. bajansailor
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    bajansailor Marine Surveyor

    Google tells me that the Culler Long John skiff is 21' 9" long - but this is apparently too long for your mooring.
    What is the maximum length allowed for your mooring?
    Is 19' still too long? This 19' skiff from Duckworks has a small sail - is this what you are thinking of?
    19' Sailing Dory Plans PDF https://duckworks.com/19-sailing-dory-plans/

    Re the FAO designed skiff, she is now 50 years old, and designed for planked construction rather than plywood.
    As you intend to build in plywood, it would be prudent to look for plywood plans instead.
    Have a look also at the Duckworks driftboats - do any of these look similar to what you have in mind?
    Plans & Kits - Plans by type - Rowboats - Driftboats - Duckworks Boat Builders Supply https://duckworks.com/plans/driftboats/
     
  3. Milehog
    Joined: Aug 2006
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    Location: NW

    Milehog Clever Quip

    Agree that it is best to choose plans designed for plywood.
    IMO a dory will row better than a drift boat. Dories, while they usually are good boats, have been given a mystique that is sometimes exaggerated.
    A drift boat is designed for maneuverability which comes at the expense of directional stability and speed.
    Dig through Duckworks plans, take your time as they are still organizing them.
    Here is a UN esque model available in two lengths by a respecter designer.
    Clarence River Dory Printed Plans - Duckworks Boat Builders Supply
     
  4. Murky Deep
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: Massachusetts

    Murky Deep Junior Member

    I have no doubt I could work that in plywood without issue. It might sit a little high on its lines.

    Total hull length must be less than 18 ft
     
  5. HJS
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    HJS Member

  6. Murky Deep
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: Massachusetts

    Murky Deep Junior Member

    That is an interesting design. It’s not exactly what I’m looking for though.
     
  7. HJS
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    HJS Member

    .... not exactly ...
    What is it that you miss?
    JS
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2022
  8. Murky Deep
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: Massachusetts

    Murky Deep Junior Member

    Bit more freeboard, aft rocker
     
  9. HJS
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    HJS Member

    Higher freeboard means more weight, less stability and greater windage in addition to being more difficult to row.
    Larger rocker increases resistance and is harder to stay on course, in addition, higher trim angle and thus harder pounding in waves.
    In this design, all parameters are optimized for performance.
    JS
     
    Last edited: Nov 22, 2022

  10. HJS
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: 59 45 51 N 019 02 15 E

    HJS Member

    Murky Deep. 3/8-1/2.” plywood for a rowing boat the size you are planning is overkill. It is important to keep the weight as low as possible if the boat is to be as easy to drive as you wish.
     
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