Replacing floor and deck.. what should i use?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by FISHALOT, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. FISHALOT
    Joined: Jul 2012
    Posts: 17
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 11
    Location: United States

    FISHALOT Junior Member

    I am slowly redoing my 16' aluminum Bass Tracker. I have recently built a fiberglass center console that turned out pretty good. I need to replace the flooring and front and rear deck. I do not want to use any plywood and aluminum sheets Ive found to be too expensive. I need to keep the cost and weight of the material as low as possible. what do you think???thanks again for your time.


    Kevin from Florida
     
  2. Petros
    Joined: Oct 2007
    Posts: 2,937
    Likes: 139, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 1593
    Location: Arlington, WA-USA

    Petros Senior Member

    how about fiberglass/foam/fiberglass floor panels? You would need to put traction paint on it so they will not be slipery, and protect it from UV exposure, but it should not rot out.

    Also, is the design suitable for using the synthetic deck planking? Like Trex brand.

    You also might consider using pressure treated plywood, it should not rot. You will want to protect where it comes in contact with any metal to prevent corrosion, use gaskets or sealant where it will come in contact with any metal.

    Good luck.
     
  3. the1much
    Joined: Jul 2007
    Posts: 3,897
    Likes: 44, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 696
    Location: maine

    the1much hippie dreams

    fiberglass would cost way more then ply. ive replaced many many bass boat floors with cheap ply coated on both sides with cheap poly glass resin. and they last three times longer then marine ply and their weight isnt that bad at all. just make sure you coat all the wood,every cut and every hole you make in it.
     
  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 470, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    If cost is a concern, you need to reconsider plywood, as it's the cheapest way to go, given it's strength and stiffness.

    If you go with foam, you're cost will be tied up in fabric and resin. PT plywood is an option, though not a good one. PT solid wood isn't bad with under wet foot traction, but PT plywood is terrible, often a bit slimy. You could paint it and add some texture, but the quality of PT plywood is horrible, unless you special order some APA - BC Exterior. These panels are a little better, but still not very good compared to an Aquatech panel. Lastly the biggest problem with PT plywood is you have to rely on mechanically fastening it to stringers, perimeter cleats, etc. as epoxy doesn't stick to it very well, unless very dry, heavily toothed and extra wide tabbing is used.

    In the end, if cost is a deciding factor, you'll find it difficult to rival plywood. You could try cedar slats, which is a very traditional way to go. It's not especially costly, excellent rot resistance and easy to install.

    Some will mention Cosa board and other products, but again, just look up how much a 4x8 sheet is going to cost and you'll quickly realize why plywood is used so much.
     
  5. Zindab
    Joined: Aug 2012
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Airlie Beach

    Zindab New Member

    Ply Floors

    I am just Looking at a new product from International Paints cant remember the name but its a ply sealer you paint on is meant to stop rot and seal it against water.
    I am going to try it on my new 38 foot cat insides.

    Regards: Bernie
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 470, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    The new product from International is an LPU. The two part polyurethane is effective, though does yellow with UV exposure. It's not water proof, but is highly resistant. It will not "stop" rot, but can be an effective coating in interior locations, where immersion and soaking isn't likely. In short, it's fine for furniture, shelves, table tops, etc. I wouldn't use it anywhere near a bilge, inside a head or shower or anywhere on a light colored wood that will see direct UV exposure. In fact, it doesn't seem to have as much UV inhibitors, that other LPU's offer, such as Bristol Finish.
     

  7. Zindab
    Joined: Aug 2012
    Posts: 3
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Airlie Beach

    Zindab New Member

    Thanks for the advice will look into it further the recomendation was as you sugested for the inside and then recoated will have to ask the question about the rot issue though as this was my main reason for going this way.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.