Replacing bad part of flooring in boat

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by midcap, May 28, 2015.

  1. midcap
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    midcap Junior Member

    I just bought a 1985 222 CCP aquasport. The front deck is soft due to a poorly sealed hatch.

    I would like to fix the issue, but I have a question regrading how to get the plywood to adhere to the bottom fiberglass skin.

    Basically what I intend to do is remove the top skin of glass. Remove the old wet and soft wood sand down the lower skin and then glue down the ply so that way I can glue down the top skin and then glass in the edges.

    My issue is, how do I clamp the ply to the bottom skin in order to get a really good bond?

    I seriously doubt that just putting water filled drums on top is going to get the bond that I need. Unless I am underestimating the bonding power of thickened epoxy?
     
  2. rasorinc
    Joined: Nov 2007
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Using epoxy you do not want to clamp very tight and starve the bonded part of Goo. Epoxy likes a thicker joint then other glues. Weights will do just fine..
     
  3. midcap
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    midcap Junior Member

    Thanks! That sure will make my life a lot easier. :)

    I imagine a consistency between mayonnaise and peanut butter would work best?
     
  4. rasorinc
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    rasorinc Senior Member

    Be sure to follow the manufactures directions RE thickening their epoxy.
     
  5. midcap
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    midcap Junior Member

    Thanks for the tip, last thing I want is for it not to adhere.
     
  6. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Sand bags work great. Epoxy just needs just enough pressure to touch the two joining pieces together, with the goo in between. Look for "ooze out" around the edges, which is a good thing.

    Download the free "User's Guides" from westsystem.com and the "Epoxy Book" from systemthree.com for an overview of mixing goo and using thickeners.
     
  7. midcap
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    midcap Junior Member

    Thanks, I didn't know about the system 3 website!
     

  8. midcap
    Joined: Oct 2013
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    midcap Junior Member

    I was looking into nidacore instead of ply and the plain board is was cheaper than the laminated core, I'm I missing somthing? I don't see how a few layers of glass adds 200-300 dollars more to the price?

    Also, is it better than putting plywood back? I imagine I would have to set in some aluminum plates where I plan on mounting a t top, leaning post etc, it seems like using my tried and true marine tech PT ply is less of a headache.
     
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