Repairing transom delaminate

Discussion in 'Fiberglass and Composite Boat Building' started by nikous, Nov 30, 2010.

  1. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yes, that's one way of doing it Nikous. Considering your hull appears to need painting anyway, this is the cost effective way to go. Naturally, you'll have considerable fairing to do to the outer skin, but this is a given. Make sure you leave a healthy flange to bond to around the perimeter of the transom. This will be feathered back and tied into the repair laminate. I would consider 100 mm minimum for this. You will have to pop the deck cap or cut away a small potion (which will also be rebonded later) to facilitate removal and installation of the new core, but this is also a normal part of the job.
     
  2. LMB
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: North Carolina

    LMB Junior Member

    IF the transom in fact stops at the knee braces I believe you can successfully recore by removing the outer skin as Par described. I'm just a little skeptical as the last boat transom I did was very similar and I would have "bet the bank" the core stopped at the knee braces, however - once I removed the internal structure it revealed that the transom in fact extended to the stern corners. The hull "extensions" on each side of the stern were filled with foam behind the transom. On the other hand, if you remove the outer skin and core to discover the transom extends further the guys on the forum can walk you thru a solution. There's always a way and you have to start somewhere - but you can save alot of problems with good planning.

    Not to get you completely side tracked, but you might look at Nida-core's method of pouring a transom with their Nida-bond product. It may work for your situation.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Assuming a standard size transom the Nida Core pour in transom stuff will work out at about $750 worth of Nida goo.

    Agreed, LMB has a good point and a few test holes should confirm the transom's actual width.
     
  4. nikous
    Joined: Nov 2008
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    Location: Greece

    nikous Junior Member

    [​IMG]

    Looking the inner skin of my transom, I just noticed the down portion is thicker than upper. That’s mean there is a substance (what’s this - how is built up?) between the plywood and the skin.
    I’m thinking would be very difficult working from outside because the inner skin (where I’ll enforce the plywood) won’t be absolutely flat.
    What do you say?

    Thanks again and again

    It would be cheaper I buy a new boat than ordering Nida product from USA to Greece. lol
     

  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 478, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Nikous, the best thing you can do is clear off the transom. You need to get in there and work on things, so start pulling and labeling stuff. Then you can make some exploratory holes, though since you already have a big hole on the outside skin, you could just make another hole past the transom knee and see if they carried the plywood from topside to topside.
     
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